Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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though a strong mannerist, 1 and easily distinguishable by the large noses and shambling legs of his figures. In his pictures his colouring was raw, nor in any light did he attain excellence. He was a rough man, with good natural parts, and a humourist—a character often tasted by contemporaries, but which seldom assimilates with or forgives the rising generation. He died of the gout at his house in Dean-street, Soho, in 1776, aged sixty-eight. 2


SAMUEL SCOTT,

(—1772,)

of the same era, was not only the first painter of his own age, but one whose works will charm in every age. If he was but second to Vandevelde 3 in sea-pieces, he excelled him in variety, and often introduced buildings in his pictures with consummate skill. His views of London- bridge, of the quay at the Custom-house, &c. were equal to his marines, 4 and his figures were judiciously chosen and admirably painted; nor were his washed drawings inferior to his finished pictures. Sir Edward Walpole has several of his largest and most capital works. The gout harassed and terminated his life, but he had formed a scholar that compensated for his loss to the public, Mr. Marlow. Mr. Scott died October 12, 1772, leaving an only daughter by his wife, who survived him till April 1781. 5

____________________
1
Churchill, in his first book of Gotham, objects that fault to him.
2
[Hayman was one of the original thirty-six members, and the first librarian ot the Royal Academy. See a further account of him in Edwards's Anecdotes of Painters, published as a continuation of this work. London, 1808.—W.]
3
Walpole has shown a great partiality to this painter ; but few of the admirers of the younger Vandevelde would admit of the near approximation between them. The value set upon their works respectively, in the present day, although those of Scott have great merit, would be soon decided in a large auction of pictures—generally a safe criterion. Both his pictures and his drawings are rare. He may be styled the father of the modern school of painting in water-colours, being the first who attempted to make his drawings approach the strength of oil-pictures, instead of leaving them as mere sketches.

WILLIAM MARLOW, his pupil, became a very distinguished artist, and excelled in landscape and subjects with architecture. He improved himself by studying in Italy. A view of the Castle and Bridge of St. Angelo, at Rome, which he exhibited upon his return to England, insured to him a high reputation.—D.

4
"At Shuckborough he painted a series of naval achievements for Lord Anson, in which the genius of the painter has been regulated by the articles of war." Gilpin. See a farther criticism, Western Tour, p. 298.—D.
5
[The following pictures by Scott were sold at the Strawberry-hill sale :— "A pair of miniature paintings in oil, sea-pieces, a Battle and a Calm," sold for 6 guineas. "A view

-325-

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