Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 2

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
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age of eighty, in 1778, at Kensington, where he was buried.


FRANCIS COTES,

(1726—1770,)

scholar of Knapton, painted portraits in oil and crayons, in the latter of which he arrived at uncommon perfection, though he died untimely of the stone in July 1770, not having passed the forty-fifth year of his age. 1 His pictures of the queen holding the princess royal, then an infant, in her lap ; of his own wife; of Polly Jones, a woman of pleasure ; of Mr. Obrien, the comedian; of Mrs. Child of Osterly-park; and of Miss Wilton, now Lady Chambers; are portraits which, if they yield to Rosalba's in softness, excel hers in vivacity and invention.


WILLIAM ORAM

was bred an architect, but taking to landscape-painting, arrived at great merit in that branch; and was made master-carpenter to the Board of Works, by the interest of Sir Edward Walpole, who has several of his pictures and drawings.


JOHN SHACKLETON

was principal painter to the crown in the latter end of the reign of George II. and to his death, which happened March 16, 1767.


GIACOMO AMICONI,

(1675—1762,)

a Venetian painter of history, came to England in 1729, when he was about forty years of age. He had studied under Bellucci, in the Palatine court, and had been some

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1
In the Gesat. Mag. for 1786, is a catalogue of portraits painted by F. Cotes. Even fashion itself could not have rendered him a formidable rival to Sir J. Reynolds without an eminent degree of merit. One of his best portraits in oil, is that of Mary, Duchess of Norfolk, at Arundel-castle. His carnations are laid on with a full body of colour.—D.

[Cotes was, according to Hogarth, a better portrait painter than Reynolds ; both employed Jones to paint their draperies. He was one of the original thirty-six members of the Royal Academy, and lived in the house in Cavendish-square which was afterwards occupied by Romney, and by Sir M. A. Shoe. See Edwards's Anec dotes, and Smith's Nollckens and his Times.—W.]

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