A Century of Sonnets: The Romantic-Era Revival 1750-1850

By Paula R. Feldman; Daniel Robinson | Go to book overview
Save to active project

From Indian isles thou com'st, with summer's car,
Twilight thy love—thy guide her beaming star!

(1794)


Anna Maria Jones
(1748–1829)

Anna Maria Jones's literary career began in Calcutta, where she moved with
her husband, the philologist and author Sir William Jones, a pioneer in
comparative linguistics.While in India, she wrote poems and letters and con-
ducted botanical research, recording her discoveries in sketches and water-
colors. Illness forced her return to England shortly after publishing, in
Calcutta, a volume of poems. She edited The Works of Sir William Jones (1799)
and gathered materials for John Shore, Lord Teignmouth's memoir of her
husband (1804).


68. To Echo

I saw her in the fleeting wind,
I heard her on the sounding shore;
The fairy nymph of shadowy kind,
That oft derides the winter's roar:
I heard her lash from rock to rock,
With shrill repeating solemn shock;
I met her in the twilight's shade
As flitting o'er my pensive glade;
O'er yonder tepid lake she flew,
Her mantle gemmed with silver dew;
The bursting note swept through the sky
As the young valleys passed the sigh:
In accents varied as the passions change,
The nymph, wild Echo, sweeps the hallow range.

(1793)


69. To the Moon

Thou lovely sorceress of the witching night,
Whose paly charms through sombre regions glide;
Lured by the softness of thy silver light,
The Muse pathetic glows with conscious pride.

On the gemmed margin of the lustrous flood,
Whose ripling waters glide so sweetly by;
Oft have I listening to its murmurs stood,
Traced thy pure ray, and winged a lonely sigh!

For Thou, chaste Cynthia, o'er my gentle soul,
Shed'st the mild beam of contemplation's sway;

-54-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Century of Sonnets: The Romantic-Era Revival 1750-1850
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 279

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.