A Century of Sonnets: The Romantic-Era Revival 1750-1850

By Paula R. Feldman; Daniel Robinson | Go to book overview

Its little cap and tippet scarce can raise.
Others assert the sonnet's proper praise,
Like petaled flowers, to each its due degree,
The king-cup five, the pilewort eight bright rays,
The speedwell four, the green-tipped snowdrop three:
So 'mid the bard's all-petaled sorts is seen
The sonnet—simple flow'ret of fourteen.

(1825)


Sarah Hamilton
(c. 1769–1843)

Sarah Hamilton published four books in quick succession in London during
the mid- to late-1820s, beginning with Sonnets, Tour to Matlock, Recollections
of Scotland, and Other Poems
(1825). According to an obituary in the Gentle-
man's Magazine,
she was the youngest daughter of the physician Robert
Hamilton of Lynn, Norfolk, and she died at Leamington. She published in
1826 a translation of a six-book poem the Art of War by Frederick III, King
of Prussia. Perhaps reflecting a growing reputation, her last book, Alfred the
Great, a Drama, in Five Acts,
was published in 1829 by the distinguished firm
Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green.


367. Farewell to France

Supposed to be repeated by Mary, Queen of Scots, from the deck
of the ship which was to convey her to Scotland.

O land of elegance, where every grace
Resides—where science fills the polished mind,
How sad the bitter contrast I must find
In barren Scotia's rude and frowning face!
Oft, when away, shall memory love to trace
Thy smiling hillocks and thy flowery vales,
Thy groves, where feathered songsters tell their tales,
Thy purple vines, thy cheerful peasant race,
Thy court—but, ah! fond memory naught avails:
No more shall I of that gay court be queen!
For ever then farewell each long-loved scene.
And, see, the cruel wind now swells the sails!
I go, with feeble power to meet the storm,
Where hate and furious zeal my native shores deform.

(1825)


368. The Poppy

Light weed, whose poisoned scent with sickly power
Bears on the nerves which seek the morning air,
As thou, dire poppy, thy sleek head dost rear

-181-

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