Women and the Family in Chinese History

By Patricia Buckley Ebrey | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

When Mark Selden approached me about putting together a collection of my articles for this series, I had some trepidation. Which of my articles did I want people to read today? Which ones would work best together? I was forced to take a hard look at the various directions my research has taken over the past quarter century, to look for links among articles written for disparate purposes and decide which ones held up the best. Mark and I went back and forth by email numerous times discussing various possibilities, given Routledge's page limits. Mark naturally wanted a book that would have a wide appeal and tended to favor the broadest essays; I usually found the ones based on the most thorough research the most suitable for republishing. At least three possible foci suggested themselves: Chinese social history, which would have allowed me to include a couple of my articles on the Han to Tang period; the social and cultural history of the Song period, which would have allowed me to include some of my more recent work on Chinese visual culture; and family-gender-kinship in Chinese history, which had been the major thrust of at least half my work. In the end we settled on this last alternative, as it allowed a balance between short and long articles, ones that cover a long time span and ones focused on the Song period, ones that dealt with women and gender as well as ones that ranged further into questions of kinship organization, rituals central to family life, and even the connection between kinship and ethnic identity. It also represents a more-or-less complete body of research, as my research interests have turned in other directions over the last few years.

From my perspective, there were a couple of other incentives to putting together this volume. I was happy to get the chance to convert the romanization style of older articles from Wade-Giles to pinyin, as fewer and fewer undergraduates today are comfortable with Wade-Giles. I also appreciated the possibility of adding illustrations. The only article that had any illustrations in its original publication is the last one on “Gender and Sinology, and even in that case several additional illustrations have been added. Six of the other illustrations come from a single source, an illustrated elaboration of the Kangxi emperor's Sacred Edict, first published in 1681 and reprinted in 1903. This work had illustrations not only of general

-viii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women and the Family in Chinese History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.