100 Miles from Baghdad: With the French in Desert Storm

By James J. Cooke | Go to book overview

1

INTRODUCTION: CRISIS IN THE GULF

On 2 August 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait. A week later President George Bush dispatched the first elements of the 82nd Airborne Division and the XVIII Airborne Corps to Saudi Arabia. What started out as a deployment to the Persian Gulf to protect Saudi Arabia from any further aggression on the part of Saddam Hussein's Iraq turned into the largest overseas operation of its kind since World War II and culminated in the Persian Gulf War of 1991.

Two dozen nations, acting to enforce numerous United Nations resolutions, took part in the operation. Arab, African, and Asian states stood beside the United States, France, England, Italy, and other European nations in a UN coalition that would have been unthinkable a year before. The very idea of non-Muslim, non-Arab ground forces in Saudi Arabia preparing for a possible armed conflict with another Arab state would have sent waves of laughter through the ranks of the experts. That was utterly impossible. Saudi policy had been simply to rely on the possibility of Western, primarily American, naval and air contingents, if a crisis arose, being sent only temporarily to Saudi Arabia. By the time the Persian Gulf War was over, the United States had deployed two army Corps, two marine expeditionary divisions, air and naval forces, large numbers of logistical troops, and active duty and reserve components to number about half a million. U.S. reserves and National Guard forces were mobilized in the greatest numbers since the Korean War; many went to the Gulf, and some died there. This was unprecedented, altering world history in the last decade of this century.

The Persian Gulf War rallied the American people as they had not been since those grim days of 1941 to 1945, and in the end, Americans were able to write a finish to the dark chapters of Vietnam and Korea. An objective was stated and carried out. The military mission by January 1991 was simple: Get Iraq out of Kuwait, restore the legitimate ruler of Kuwait, and smash the offensive power of Saddam Hussein. Those missions were accomplished by

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
100 Miles from Baghdad: With the French in Desert Storm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 226

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.