A Question of Self-Esteem: The United States and the Cold War Choices in France and Italy, 1944-1958

By Alessandro Brogi | Go to book overview

3

Mastering Interdependence? Status, the “Third Force, ” and the Western Alliance

A SELF-RELIANT THIRD FORCE?

On July 8, 1948, at one of the meetings of the Washington Exploratory Talks for an Atlantic Alliance, the chief American representative, Acting Secretary of State Robert Lovett, gave his assessment of a “hypothetical nation in Western Europe, ” which he called “Neuralgia.” This nation, he explained, “was prepared resolutely to defend itself if it could obtain appropriate assistance.” Lovett went on saying that if “Neuralgia” “saw the U.S. associated with some European group to which it was not a party it might see only two alternatives, either to yield to Soviet pressure, or to appeal piecemeal to the U.S. for military assistance.” In order to avert either alternative, the United States had by that time resolved to participate in Europe's collective security arrangements.

Lovett's “diagnosis” of Europe's security problems in “neurological” terms made obvious the link between self-esteem and self-reliance in Europe. Those problems were presumably a symptom of a short-term, pathological condition to be cured, not the basis for a long-term alliance. While accepting overseas commitments, Washington remained devoted to the idea of creating an integrated, self-reliant Western Europe that would do away with the need for constant American assistance. That had been the main purpose of the Marshall Plan. Two months after its announcement, State Department Soviet expert Charles Bohlen wrote: “our main preoccupation now is just how to help Western Europe get on its feet

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Question of Self-Esteem: The United States and the Cold War Choices in France and Italy, 1944-1958
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Invitation and Pride 13
  • 2 - The Old Game 47
  • 3 - Mastering Interdependence? Status, the “third Force, ” and the Western Alliance 75
  • 4 - Mastering Interdependence? Status, Nationalism, and the European Army Plan 117
  • 5 - Mediterranean “missions” 171
  • 6 - A Question of Leadership 223
  • Conclusions 259
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 305
  • About the Author 317
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.