American Statesmen: Secretaries of State from John Jay to Colin Powell

By Edward S. Mihalkanin | Go to book overview

WALTER Q. GRESHAM (1832-1895)

Served 1893-1895

Appointed by President Grover Cleveland

Democrat

Walter Quintin Gresham was born on a modest farm in Harrison County, Indiana, on March 17, 1832. His ancestors were English and Scotch-Irish. Before he was two years old, his father, who was the county sheriff, was killed by an outlaw. As he grew up, several local politicians recognized the boy's talents and superintended his education. He attended the local country schools and May's Academy at Corydon. After a year in Indiana University's preparatory department, he read law with a prominent local Whig lawyer and was admitted to the bar in 1854.

Gresham's Whig mentors pushed him toward a career in their own party, but after the Whig collapse in the mid-1850s, he enlisted in the anti-Nebraska movement and affiliated briefly with the Know-Nothings. By 1856 he had joined the Republican Party and four years later won election to the state legislature, where he served a single term during the winter and spring of 1861. In the summer he joined the Union army and by the end of the year was named colonel of the 53rd Indiana Volunteer Infantry, attached to the Army of the Tennessee. In August 1863, he won promotion to brigadier general, but his military career was cut short the following June when he was wounded during William T. Sherman's Atlanta campaign. He left the army with the rank of brevet major general.

After the Civil War Gresham resumed the practice of law at New Albany, Indiana. In 1866 and 1868 he ran for Congress in a heavily Democratic district and lost both times. He had for years been at odds with Oliver P. Morton, the leader of the Indiana Republican Party, and when his wartime friend, President Ulysses S. Grant, offered him appointment as federal district judge for Indiana, he accepted in September 1869. For the next decade he remained ambivalent about returning to active politics. In 1880 he made a clumsy bid for the U.S. Senate but lost to Benjamin Harrison, who replaced Morton as leader of the state party and as Gresham's political nemesis.

In 1883 President Chester A. Arthur surprised Gresham with appointment as postmaster general. During the year and a half he held that office, he won praise for

-226-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Statesmen: Secretaries of State from John Jay to Colin Powell
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 572

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.