A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema

By Charles P. Mitchell | Go to book overview

The End of the World (1930/34)

AKA Paris after Dark

Rating: **** Threat: Collision with a comet

L'Ecran D'Art. Written by Abel Gance & H.S. Kraft based on Omega: Last Days of the World by Camille Flammarion; Dialogue by Jean Boyer; Photographed by Roger Hubert, Jules Kruger & Nikolas Roudakoff; Edited by F. Salabert; Music by Peter Illyich Tchaikovsky & others; Sound supervised by R. Baudouin; Produced by Harold Auten (U.S. version); Directed by Abel Gance. B & W, Original version, 105 minutes; U.S. version, 54 minutes.


ANNOTATED CAST LIST

Victor Francen (Martial Novalic, French astronomer); Jeanne Brindeau (Madame Novalic, his wife); Abel Gance (Jean Novalic, their son); Georges Colin (Werster, astronomer); Dr. Clyde Fisher (curator of astronomy, American Museum of Natural History).


SYNOPSIS

In its present form, this film is an extract, a mere torso of the original work. Like an unfinished sculpture of Michelangelo, this fragment still has a tremendous power and impact. The high rating listed above is more a tribute to Gance and his original vision than an evaluation of the footage that remains. The background of the film needs to be thoroughly examined. Abel Gance was one of the giants of world cinema, and his final silent epic, Napoleon (1927), is one of the greatest and most innovative of all films, and certainly the crown jewel of French cinema. Gance conceived his end of the world epic near the close of World War I, after completing the silent version of J'Accuse (1917). He initially intended to call the film The End of the World as Seen, Heard and Rendered by Abel Gance. It was rather loosely based on an 1894 novel by the French astronomer Camille Flammarion that portrayed the future end of the world due to a collision with a large comet. When the backers of the project began to fear that the length of this film was becoming extravagant, the producers took control of the film away from Gance. Like Erich von Stroheim and Greed (1925), a stunning and exceptional vision was hewn down to a traditional length. The picture was released in France as La Fin du Monde (1931), at a length of 105 minutes. Disheartened, Abel Gance eventually disclaimed the truncated version. This film was never shown in the United States, and according to most sources, La Fin du Monde is considered a lost film today. The next step in the process was even worse. An American distributor, Harold Auten, bought up the rights to the film and trimmed it down to an unbelievable 54 minutes. A new introduction was shot featuring Dr. Clyde Fisher, who mumbles through an opening narration

-70-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 315

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.