A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema

By Charles P. Mitchell | Go to book overview

Where Have All the People Gone? (1974)

Rating: ** Threat: Solar flare

Metromedia. Written by Lewis Carlino & Sandor Stern; Photographed by Michael Margulies; Edited by John A. Martinelli; Music by Robert Prince; Produced by Gerald I. Isenberg & Charles Fries (executive); Directed by John Llewellyn Moxey. 73 minutes.


ANNOTATED CAST LIST

Peter Graves (Stephen Anders, manufacturer from Malibu); George O'Hanlon Jr. (David Anders, his son, a science major in college); Kathleen Quinlan (Deborah Anders, his daughter); Jay W. Macintosh (Barbara Anders, his wife, a scientist); Verna Bloom (Jenny, catatonic woman); Michael-James Wixted (Michael, young boy whose parents were shot); Nobel Willingham (Jim Clancy, Sierra Mountain guide); Doug Chapin (Tom Clancy, Jim's son); Dan Barrows (truck thief); Ken Samson (Jack McFadden, survivalist who settles his family at a ranch).


SYNOPSIS

This unpretentious telefilm has a narrow focus, but it is a respectable and moderately entertaining production. It was first shown by NBC as the Thursday evening feature film on October 10, 1974. Working within a modest budget, Where Have All the People Gone nevertheless presented a credible and effective portrait of an apocalyptic event. The inconclusive ending suggests that it may have originally been intended as a pilot for a series, with Peter Graves as Stephen Anders leading his clan of survivors through new adventures each week. It is very doubtful if a series would have been successful, since the concept seems pretty well exhausted by the end of the picture.

The story opens with the Anders family on a two-week camping trip in the High Sierras with their guide Jim Clancy. Stephen's wife, Barbara, is a scientist and has to return home early. Their guide's son drives her to the local airport. Stephen and his children explore a cave where they are digging for fossils. David is a college student with an aptitude for science. His younger sister, Deborah, is somewhat bored with their vacation adventure and asks her dad if they could spend their next holiday at a resort hotel instead. At the campfire, Jim is preparing rabbit stew for dinner when the the glow from the sun starts to increase to a blinding intensity. The guide stares at the phenomenon, which is immediately followed by earth tremors. Anders and his children run out of the cave, and Jim tells them about the strange light in the sky. David turns on the transistor radio to try to learn more about the event, but all he picks up is static. As Jim lapses

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Overview: Cinematic Visions of the Apocalypse xi
  • A Guide to Apocalyptic Cinema: Fifty Films in Depth 1
  • The 27th Day (1957) 3
  • Armageddon (1998) 10
  • Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) 17
  • Crack in the World (1965) 22
  • The Dawn of the Dead (1978) 27
  • The Day the Earth Caught Fire (1961) 33
  • The Day the Sky Exploded (1958/61) 40
  • Day the World Ended (1956) 44
  • Deep Impact (1998) 48
  • Deluge (1933) 54
  • Doomsday Machine (1967/72) 59
  • Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) 63
  • The End of the World (1930/34) 70
  • Five (1951) 74
  • Holocaust 2000 (1978) 78
  • The Horn Blows at Midnight (1945) 83
  • Kronos (1957) 88
  • The Last Man on Earth (1964) 93
  • The Last War (1961) 98
  • The Last Wave (1977) 103
  • The Last Woman on Earth (1960) 108
  • Lifeforce (1985) 112
  • The Lost Missile (1958) 117
  • The Magnetic Monster (1953) 122
  • The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1936) 127
  • Mars Attacks! (1996) 133
  • Meteor (1979) 139
  • Moonraker (1979) 145
  • The Night the World Exploded (1957) 152
  • Noah's Ark (1929) 157
  • No Blade of Grass (1970) 162
  • No Survivors Please (1964) 168
  • One Night Stand (1984) 172
  • On the Beach (1959) 177
  • Quiet Earth (1985) 184
  • Robot Monster (1953) 189
  • Runestone (1991) 194
  • The Satan Bug (1965) 199
  • The Seventh Sign (1988) 205
  • Solar Crisis (1990) 210
  • Star Trek—the Motion Picture (1978) 214
  • Target Earth (1953) 221
  • Them! (1954) 226
  • Virus (1980) 231
  • Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961) 238
  • The War of the Worlds (1953) 243
  • When Worlds Collide (1951) 249
  • Where Have All the People Gone? (1974) 255
  • The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1959) 259
  • Zarkorr the Invader (1996) 265
  • Appendices 269
  • Appendix A 271
  • Appendix B 279
  • Appendix C 283
  • Index 285
  • About the Author 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 315

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.