Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

By Kathy J. Whitson | Go to book overview

Hareton and Catherine make plans to marry, now that they are free of the oppressive hold on their lands and very persons. Though neighborhood rumors suggest that Heathcliff and a woman travel the moors, Lockwood visits the three graves on the hillside and imagines quiet “slumbers for the sleepers in that quiet earth” (256).


References and Suggested Readings
Alexander, Lynn M. “Emily Brontë.” An Encyclopedia of British Women Writers. Ed. Paul Schlueter and June Schlueter. Revised and Expanded ed. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1998.
Brontë, Charlotte. “Biographical Notice of Ellis and Acton Bell.” 1850. Wuthering Heights. Ed. William M. Sale, Jr. and Richard J. Dunn. New York: W. W. Norton, 1990.
Brontë, Emily. Wuthering Heights. 1847. New York: W. W. Norton, 1990.
Davies, Stevie. Emily Brontë, The Artist as a Free Woman. Manchester: Carcenet, 1983.

See also Brontë, Charlotte; Woolf, Virginia.

BROWN, RITA MAE

Born in 1944 in rural Pennsylvania, Rita Mae Brown was adopted by working-class parents, Ralph and Julia Ellen Brown. The family moved to Fort Lauderdale when Rita Mae was just eleven, and in Florida, Brown excelled as a student and earned a scholarship to the University of Florida. Brown's involvement in the Civil Rights movement gained her enemies at the University of Florida; as Ladd notes, an altercation with the dean of women ended with Brown accused of “seducing the president of the Tri Delts and numerous other female women, as well as sleeping with black men and black women” (69). Brown soon left Florida for New York where she enrolled at New York University and received a BA degree in 1968; she earned a PhD degree in political science at the Institute for Policy Studies in 1973. Brown's early works include a volume of poetry, The Hand That Cradles the Rock (1971), and a volume of political essays, A Plain Brown Wrapper (1976). It is her 1973 novel Rubyfruit Jungle, however, that has secured her a continuing critical and popular attention. Initially published by a small feminist house, Daughters Press, the novel was reissued by Bantam Books in 1977 and has obtained a significant following. The success of this unapologetically lesbian novel has labeled Brown as a lesbian writer, a category she rejects as narrow and fraught with an insidious sexism. She says, “Next time anybody calls me a lesbian writer I'm going to knock their teeth in. I'm a writer and I'm a woman and I'm from the South and I'm alive, and that is that.”

Rita Mae Brown's largely autobiographical Rubyfruit Jungle (1973) is the coming-of-age story of young Molly Bolt, who embodies the suggestion in her last name and does bolt from both the expectations placed on her gender and from her intolerant mother. Carrie Bolt, her mother, embodies yet another meaning of the word bolt, for she carries a “bolt” that she hurls at Molly time and again—the weapon is that Molly is illegitimate. When Molly is only seven, her mother first

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Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • List of Entries vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • References and Suggested Readings 3
  • References and Suggested Readings 7
  • References and Suggested Readings 13
  • References and Suggested Readings 17
  • References and Suggested Readings 20
  • References and Suggested Readings 24
  • B 33
  • References and Suggested Readings 35
  • References and Suggested Readings 44
  • References and Suggested Readings 48
  • C 56
  • D 72
  • References and Suggested Readings 78
  • E 80
  • F 82
  • References and Suggested Readings 91
  • References and Suggested Readings 95
  • G 96
  • References and Suggested Readings 105
  • H 106
  • References and Suggested Readings 116
  • References and Suggested Readings 123
  • I 124
  • J 125
  • K 132
  • L 140
  • References and Suggested Readings 144
  • References and Suggested Readings 146
  • M 150
  • References and Suggested Readings 176
  • N 177
  • References and Suggested Readings 186
  • O 187
  • P 193
  • References and Suggested Readings 201
  • References and Suggested Readings 205
  • R 206
  • References and Suggested Readings 207
  • References and Suggested Readings 212
  • S 213
  • References and Suggested Readings 220
  • References and Suggested Readings 221
  • References and Suggested Readings 226
  • References and Suggested Readings 232
  • References and Suggested Readings 243
  • Y 244
  • References and Suggested Readings 249
  • References and Suggested Readings 250
  • W 251
  • References and Suggested Readings 256
  • References and Suggested Readings 284
  • Y 285
  • Index 293
  • About the Author 301
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