Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

By Kathy J. Whitson | Go to book overview

Other works by Hulme include Lost Possessions (1985), Te Kaihua (1987), and Bait (1999).


References and Suggested Readings
Covi, Giovanna. “Keri Hulme's The Bone People: A Critique of Gender.” Imagination and the Creative Impulse in the New Literatures in English. Ed. M.T. Bindella and G.V. Davis. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1993. 219-31.
Hulme, Keri. The Bone People. 1983. New York: Penguin, 1986.
———. “An Interview with Keri Hulme.” Interview with Andrew Peek. New Literatures Review 20 (Winter 1990): 1-11.
———. “Keri Hulme.” In the Same Room: Conversations with New Zealand Writers. Ed. Elizabeth Alley and Mark Williams. Auckland: Auckland University Press, 1992. 140-56.
———. “Keri Hulme.” Talking About Ourselves: Twelve New Zealand Poets in Conversation with Harry Ricketts. Ed. Harry Ricketts. Wellington: Mallinson Rendel, 1986. 17-29.
———. “Keri Hulme.” Interview with Janet Charman. Broadsheet 173 (Nov. 1989): 4-16.
King, Bruce. “Fiction from the World's Edge.” Rev. of The Bone People by Keri Hulme. Sewanee Review 94 (1986): xlv-xlvii.

HURSTON, ZORA NEALE

Born in 1891 in Eatonville, Florida, the African American novelist and folklorist Zora Neale Hurston grew up in the first incorporated, self-governing, all-black town in the United States—an experience that left a profound mark on her sense of racial identity as well as on her fictional and nonfictional writings. Her father, John Hurston, was a Baptist preacher and served as the mayor of Eatonville for three terms. Her mother, Lucy, was a strong female role model who encouraged Zora's independent and creative spirit. After her mother died when she was only nine years old, Zora was rejected by her father and his new wife and took up a wanderer's existence. At age fourteen, she joined a Gilbert and Sullivan traveling dramatic troupe, working as a wardrobe girl and maid. After landing in Baltimore, she enrolled in Morgan Academy and then went on to attend Howard University in Washington, D.C.

In 1925, Hurston arrived in New York City, where she became involved with the circle of writers and artists associated with the Harlem Renaissance, a black arts movement of the 1920s. Hurston contributed a story to Alain Locke's influential collection The New Negro (1925) and helped edit the journal Fire!! founded by Langston Hughes and Wallace Thurman in 1926. Hughes and Hurston collaborated on a play called Mule Bone, an artistic endeavor that led to their subsequent falling out. Hughes later criticized Hurston for playing the “perfect 'darkie'” in order to obtain patronage from wealthy white individuals. Ironically, Hughes himself accepted support from the same elderly white patron, Mrs. R. Osgood Mason, who supported Hurston for several years.

-116-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 302

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.