Consumer Health Information Source Book

By Alan M. Rees | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The first edition of the Consumer Health Information Source Book was published more than 20 years ago. In the foreword, Donald Vickery, M.D., stated that “the recognition of the individual's responsibility for health and the physician's responsibility to advise and assist in the individual's decision making has resulted in the most significant change in the doctor-patient relationship in the last century, perhaps ever. Intelligent decision making is impossible, however, without relevant, up-to-date information on a wide variety of topics.” This statement provides a cogent rationale for consumer health information services and is as valid today as it was in 198L Consumer need for health information remains the constant. What has changed in the interim is related to the mode of information access. Health information is now available to millions of persons who are empowered with information derived from the Internet and the pervasive media. In contrast, two decades ago, consumers were faced with the problem of identifying relevant and useful information and then locating where it could be accessed. Access was limited to print resources that could be either purchased or consulted in medical and public libraries. At that time, libraries were not yet accustomed to disseminating health information to the public. A former director of the Cleveland Public Library objected to providing “medical advice” to the public and wondered whether “legal advice” would follow as a logical next step. This was a true red herring because information was confused with advice.

In 2002, the situation has been transformed because there is now organized unmediated access to print and electronic resources. Moreover, libraries are both willing and capable of responding to the information needs of patients and consumers with a variety of products and services. The doors of medical and public libraries are today wide open to consumers. Beneficially to consumers and patients, the National Library of Medicine has more recently assumed a leadership role in providing health information to the public. This represents a significant sea change. In the third edition of the Consumer Health Information Source Book (1990), it was argued, “At the very least the National Library of Medicine should commission an objective study of present access to the lay literature for the purpose of defining the problems involved, possible options, and modes of cooperation between the federal government and the private sector in providing improved and coordinated access to information of vital concern to all Americans.” Consumer access is now greatly facilitated, and those seeking information no longer have to master the arcane complexity of subject headings, descriptors, and Boolean logic in constructing search strategies. Instead, an avalanche of information can be rapidly identified and downloaded by consumers. The true revolution in medical consumerism lies in the liber-

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Consumer Health Information Source Book
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 326

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.