Asian American Short Story Writers: An A-to-Z Guide

By Guiyou Huang | Go to book overview

JEFFERY PAUL CHAN (1942-)

Fu-jen Chen


♦ BIOGRAPHY

Born in Stockton in 1942 and raised in Richmond, California, Jeffery Paul Chan is a third-generation American of Chinese ancestry. A grandson of a Nevada railroad worker and a son of a successful dentist, young Jeffery was weary of doing what his elders expected him to do, once claiming that “In a way I was tired of being Chinese…. I was tired of following the crowd, because all the Chinese students I knew were pursuing such scientific, technological careers as medicine and engineering” (Hsu and Palubinskas 76). Changing his undergraduate major at the University of California at Berkeley, Chan disappointed his father when he quit his study at the prestigious university and went to Spain's University of Barcelona where he tutored in English and studied Spanish culture. Earning his bachelor's degree in English, he continued his graduate study in creative writing at San Francisco. Later he also studied folklore at the University of California because folklore to him serves as access to “know more about different people” by “opening up many doors to the different cultures” (Hsu and Palubinskas 77). His strong interests in literature as well as various cultures were rooted in his desire to know more about his own ethnic heritage, one that his totally Americanized father was never willing to share.

Chan is currently a professor in the Department of Asian American Studies and English at San Francisco State University. The founding director of the Combined Asian-American Resources Project, Inc., as well as the founding member and former chairperson of the Asian American Studies Department at San Francisco State University, Chan has long championed the inclusion of Asian American literature in the study of American literature. In addition, he

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Asian American Short Story Writers: An A-to-Z Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - The Asian American Short Story—the Cases of Sui Sin Far, Yamamoto, and Penaranda xiii
  • Peter Bacho (1950-) 1
  • Himani Bannerji (1942-) 5
  • Susham Bedi (1945-) 11
  • Cecilia Manguerra Brainard (1947-) 17
  • Carlos Bulosan (1911-1956) 23
  • Jeffery Paul Chan (1942-) 31
  • G.S.Sharat Chandra (1938-2000) 39
  • Diana Chang (1934-) 45
  • Frank Chin (1940-) 51
  • Susan Choi (1969-) 61
  • Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni (1956-) 65
  • Sui Sin Far (Edith Maude Eaton) (1865-1914) 73
  • Winnifred Eaton (1875-1954) 85
  • Jessica Hagedorn (1949-) 93
  • Gish Jen (1956-) 101
  • Ha Jin (1956-) 109
  • Lonny Kaneko (1939-) 115
  • Alex Kuo (1939-) 119
  • Jhumpa Lahiri (1967-) 125
  • Andrew Lam (1963-) 135
  • Evelyn Lau (1971-) 141
  • Chang-Rae Lee (1965-) 147
  • Don Lee (1959-) 151
  • Monfoon Leong (1916-1964) 155
  • Russell Leong (1950-) 159
  • Shirley Geok-Lin Lim (1944-) 167
  • David Wong Louie (1954-) 173
  • Darrell H.Y.Lum (1950-) 177
  • Rohinton Mistry (1952-) 183
  • Shani Mootoo (1958-) 189
  • Toshio Mori (1910-1980) 195
  • Bharati Mukherjee (1940-) 203
  • Fae Myenne Ng (1956-) 215
  • Hualing Nieh (1925-) 225
  • Susan Nunes (1943-) 237
  • Gary Pak (1952-) 243
  • Ty Pak (1938-) 251
  • Nahid Rachlin (1947-) 257
  • Raja Rao (1908-) 263
  • Patsy Sumie Saiki (1915-) 269
  • Bienvenido N. Santos (1911-1996) 273
  • Kathleen Tyau (1947-) 281
  • JosÉ Garcia Villa (1908-1997) 287
  • Sylvia A.Watanabe (1953-) 295
  • Hisaye Yamamoto (Desoto) (1921-) 303
  • Lois-Ann Yamanaka (1961-) 317
  • Karen Tei Yamashita (1951-) 327
  • Wakako Yamauchi (1924-) 333
  • John Yau (1950-) 337
  • Selected Bibliography 345
  • Index 349
  • About the Editor and Contributors 355
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