Communism in History and Theory: The European Experience

By Donald F. Busky | Go to book overview

2

Western Europe

Eurocommunism is a term applied to a pluralistic form of Marxism-Leninism found in some, but not all the Western European countries, such as France, Spain, and Italy. Unlike those in Soviet bloc Eastern European nations, Eurocommunist parties were more willing to compromise with the ideas of political democracy. Many of them have dropped the word communism from their party names. Often there have been those in these Western European communist parties who have not been willing to accept such changes in name and Marxist-Leninist principles. They have frequently split off to form reconstituted and orthodox communist parties. Still other Western European communist parties remain orthodox with regard to Marxism-Leninism, and have not changed their names.


FRANCE

The Parti communiste français (PCF), or French Communist Party, was founded in 1920, as a split from the Parti socialiste, section français de l'internationale ouvrière (SFIO), or French Section of the Workers International. 1 The occasion was the Socialists' eighteenth congress, held in Tours on December 25 to 30, 1920. The motion to seek affiliation of the SFIO with the Comintern was presented by Jean Longuet, a grandson of Karl Marx, as well as by future SFIO General Secretary Paul Faure. It passed the Committee for the Reconstruction of the International by a vote of 3,208 to 1,022 opposed. Léon Blum had urged party members to abstain

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Communism in History and Theory: The European Experience
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction: Communism in Europe xvii
  • 1 - Eastern Europe 1
  • 2 - Western Europe 41
  • 3 - Neo-Marxism 93
  • 4 - A Critique of Marxism 119
  • Appendix 159
  • Bibliography 163
  • Index 169
  • About the Author 173
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