Ethnic Identity Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy

By Thomas Ambrosio | Go to book overview

Chapter 10

Legitimate Influence or Parochial Capture? Conclusions on Ethnic Identity Groups and the Formulation of U.S. Foreign Policy

Thomas Ambrosio

In many ways … the participation of ethnic diasporas in shaping U.S. foreign policy is a truly positive phenomenon.

—Yossi Shain 1

At present, the negative consequences of ethnic involvement may well outweigh the undoubted benefits this activism at times confers on America in world affairs.

—Tony Smith 2

The role of ethnic identity groups in the formulation of U.S. foreign policy appears to be a durable characteristic of the foreign policy process. Prior to the rise of a “multicultural foreign policy”—in which non-Anglo-Saxon groups became increasingly prevalent and powerful—U.S. foreign policy had long had an ethnic component. McCartney's chapter (chapter 2), for example, shows how American national identity was closely connected to the dual principles of Anglo-Saxon superiority and democratic political values. America's entry onto the world stage during the Spanish-American War was driven in large part by the ethnic-ideological identity of Americans. Furthermore, Catherine Scott's chapter (chapter 3) identifies “whiteness” as a basic principle shaping U.S. policy toward South African apartheid. Together, these two chapters illustrate that the “ethnic influence” on U.S. foreign policy began much earlier than many commentators would admit. 3 The principal cause of this misunderstanding is what Walker Connor, an outstanding observer of nationalism, called the “terminological chaos” that continues to infect much of political science and sociology—in particular, ignoring the distinctions between nations (political-cultural entities) and states (political-territorial entities) and employing the term ethnic group to refer almost exclusively to minorities within the United States or cultural groups outside of the United

-199-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethnic Identity Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.