Ethnic Identity Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy

By Thomas Ambrosio | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Yossi Shain, “Multicultural Foreign Policy, ” Foreign Policy 100 (1995): 87.
2.
Tony Smith, Foreign Attachments (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), 2.
3.
Paul Glastris, Kevin Whitelaw, Bruce Auster, and Barbra Murray, “Multicultural Foreign Policy in Washington, ” U.S. News and World Report, 21 July 1997, 30-35.
4.
Walker Connor, Ethnonationalism: The Quest for Understanding (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1994), 28-66, 89-117.
5.
Alexander DeConde, Ethnicity, Race, and American Foreign Policy (Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1992).
6.
Mathias's article follows this line in his contrast between assimilated and unassimilated ethnic groups. Charles McCurdy Mathias, Jr., “Ethnic Groups and Foreign Policy, ” Foreign Affairs 59 (Summer 1981): 979-80.
7.
Ibid., 981.
8.
“All Politics Is Global, ” Wall Street Journal, 25 November 1992, A12, cited in Eric M. Uslander, “All Politics Are Global: Interest Groups and the Making of Foreign Policy, ” in Interest Group Politics, 4th ed., ed. Allan J. Cigler and Burdett A. Loomis (Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Press, 1995), 370.
9.
Shain, “Multicultural Foreign Policy, ” 87.
10.
Nathan Glazer, We Are All Multiculturalists Now (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997).
11.
Joan Morrison and Charlotte Fox Zabusky, quoted in William Keough, “The View from the Melting Pot, ” Christian Science Monitor, 1 October 1980, 17.
12.
Shain, “Multicultural Foreign Policy, ” 86.
13.
See McCartney (chapter 2) and Scott (chapter 3) in this volume. Also see many of the pieces in this volume's Selected Bibliography under “White Identity” and “African-Americans.”
14.
See Charles P. Henry, “Introduction: Black Global Politics in a Post-Cold War World, ” in Foreign Policy and the Black (Inter)national Interest, ed. Charles P. Henry (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2000), 1-16.
15.
James Risen and Jonathan Peterson, “Economy Elbows Other Issues Aside, ” Los Angeles Times, 2 November 1992, A14.
16.
It should be noted, however, that there is little public support for a return to full isolationism. Moreover, America continues to have enduring foreign interests that require at least some level of internationalism, and events overseas may force it to assume an unwanted role internationally. Thus, it is important not to exaggerate the tendency for post-Cold War isolationism. Ole R. Holsti, “Public Opinion and U.S. Foreign Policy after the Cold War, ” in After the End, ed. James M. Scott (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1998), 138-69.
17.
Kenneth Longmyer, “Black American Demands, ” Foreign Policy 60 (Fall 1985): 3-17.
18.
Shain, “Multicultural Foreign Policy, ” 74.
19.
Richard N. Haass summarizes the arguments of the neo-isolationists in The Reluctant Sheriff (New York: Council on Foreign Relations, 1997), 55-60.
20.
For example, during the 2000 presidential campaign, only Reform Party candidate Patrick Buchanan actively supported isolationism.
21.
Shain, “Multicultural Foreign Policy, ” 87. Also see his longer treatment in Yossi Shain, Marketing the American Creed Abroad: Diasporas in the U.S. and Their Homelands (Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1999).

-213-

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