Contemporary Perspectives on the Native Peoples of Pampa, Patagonia, and Tierra del Fuego: Living on the Edge

By Claudia Briones; José Luis Lanata | Go to book overview

8

Pulmarí: Protected Indigenous Territory

Coordinación de Organizaciones Mapuche

This is a proposal that was prepared by the Native Mapuche People, to put forward to the Argentine state. It aims at protecting Mapuche communal areas, by means of the creation of a management category that acknowledges the fundamental right we have as a people to control and administer natural resources that are found in our territories.


HOW THIS NEW CONCEPT OR LAND CATEGORY AROSE

This submission arose after endless talks and debates among native Mapuche authorities and our communities, all along the 5-year claiming process to demand our legitimate right over the Pulmarí region, which is located in the midwestern part of the Argentine province of Neuquén, close to the international border with Chile. Each sleepless night we spent when looking after our land that was being threatened, each drive of the flock during the hard winter, each thought at incessant judicial notices at courts positing incomprehensible charges against us, each time we were filled with disgust at the infamous handling of overdominated brothers who underestimated their rakizuam, 1 each fire lit while waiting for the fulfillment of the eviction ordinance issued by the judicial system—all of these circumstances moved us to find the way to express and work out a proposal of mutual understanding and respect. The proposal that we developed would certainly not come out of the Pulmarí Interstate Corporation (CIP), a state-

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