Darwin and Archaeology: A Handbook of Key Concepts

By John P. Hart; John Edward Terrell et al. | Go to book overview

However, we have also discussed some very different perspectives on biological constraints. The variability selection hypothesis proposes that what distinguishes our species is the adaptation to uncertainty and to environmental novelty. In addition, the theory of gene-culture coevolution addresses situations where even within the past 10,000 years, cultural change has produced new selection pressures on the human genome (and thus, changing gene frequencies). If these approaches are correct, then they have very different implications for the way we analyze the archaeological record. We should be trying to identify a trend toward increasing diversity of cultural adaptations during the Paleolithic. We should also be trying to identify ways in which cultural changes during the past 10,000 years would have altered the contexts for natural selection on gene frequencies, and we should be testing our predictions of consequent changes in the genetic compositions of populations. If our social and cognitive abilities act not as constraints on adaptation, but as buffers that enable us to cope with a large range of environmental variation, then we should not expect to find significant selection pressures for the genetic modification of these abilities. The most intense selection pressures for genetic adaptation should be on aspects of our physiology that cannot easily be buffered against local environmental variables by social or cognitive means. These would certainly include genetic traits influencing mechanisms of disease resistance and of nutrient absorption.


REFERENCES
Balasse, M., H. Bocherens, A. Tresset, A. Mariotti, and J. D. Vigne. (1997). Emergence of dairy production in the Neolithic? Contribution of isotopic analysis of cattle archaeological bones. Comptes rendus de l'Académie des Sciences Série 2A 325: 1005-1010.
Brown, D. E. (1991). Human Universals. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
Cordain, L., J. B. Miller, S. B. Eaton, N. Mann, S.H.A. Holt, and J. D. Speth. (2000). Plant-animal subsistence ratios and macronutrient energy estimations in worldwide hunter-gatherer diets. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 71: 682-692.
Cosmides, L. (1989). The logic of social exchange: Has natural selection shaped how humans reason? Cognition 31: 187-276.
Cosmides, L., and J. Tooby. (1989). Evolutionary psychology and the generation of culture, Part II. Ethology and Sociobiology 10: 51-97.
Dudd, S. N., and R. P. Evershed. (1998). Direct demonstration of milk as an element of archaeological economies. Science 282: 1478-1481.
Durham, W. H. (1991). Coevolution. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
Isaac, G. L. (1978). The food-sharing behavior of proto-human hominids. Scientific American 238: 90-108.
Larsen, C. S. (2000). Skeletons in Our Closet: Revealing Our Past through Bioarchaeology. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

-46-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Darwin and Archaeology: A Handbook of Key Concepts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Table of Key Words xv
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Adaptation 15
  • References 26
  • Chapter 3 - Biological Constraints 29
  • References 46
  • Chapter 4 - Cause 49
  • References 65
  • Chapter 5 - Classification 69
  • Chapter 6 - Complexity 89
  • Chapter 7 - Culture 107
  • References 123
  • Chapter 8 - Descent 125
  • Chapter 9 - History 143
  • Chapter 10 - Individuals 161
  • References 180
  • Chapter 11 - Learning 183
  • References 198
  • Chapter 12 - Models 201
  • Chapter 13 - Natural Selection 225
  • Chapter 14 - Population 243
  • About the Contributors 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 259

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.