Darwin and Archaeology: A Handbook of Key Concepts

By John P. Hart; John Edward Terrell et al. | Go to book overview

It is sufficient simply to claim that natural selection has conferred on humans the cognitive ability to recognize, and act to perpetuate, adaptive traits. If evolutionary archaeologists wish to argue instead that humans remain unaware of the adaptive consequences of their cultural behavior, then it will be necessary to explain how and why current social theory is wrong about the contingent nature of cultural traits, or to offer some description of the hitherto unrecognized process that ensures the stability of adaptive traits in the face of cultural processes that continually threaten to undermine them.


REFERENCES
Arnold, M. (1883) [1869]. Culture & Anarchy: An Essay in Political and Social Criticism. New York: Macmillan.
Boas, F. (1940) [1896]. The limitations of the comparative method of anthropology. In F. Boas (ed.), Race, Language and Culture. New York: Macmillan, pp. 271-304.
Bourdieu, P. (1990). The Logic of Practice. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
Brumann, C. (1999). Writing for culture: Why a successful concept should not be discarded. Current Anthropology 40: S1-13, S21-27.
Dunnell, R. D. (1980). Evolutionary theory and archaeology. In M. B. Schiffer (ed.), Advances in Archaeological Method and Theory, vol. 3. New York: Academic Press, pp. 55-99.
Ferraro, G. (1992). Cultural Anthropology: An Applied Perspective. St Paul, MN: West.
Geertz, C. (1973). The Interpretation of Cultures. New York: Basic Books.
Giddens, A. (1984). The Constitution of Society. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Handy, E.S.C., and E. G. Handy. (1972). Native Planters in Old Hawaii: Their Life, Lore, and Environment. Honolulu: Bernice P. Bishop Museum Press.
Hannerz, U. (1996). Transnational Connections: Cultures, Peoples, Places. London: Routledge.
Harris, M. (1981). America Now: The Anthropology of a Changing Culture. New York: Simon and Schuster.
Haviland, W. A. (1999). Cultural Anthropology. Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt Brace.
Huntington, S. P. (1996). The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order. New York: Simon and Schuster.
Jones, G. T., R. D. Leonard, and A. L. Abbott. (1995). The structure of selectionist explanations in archaeology. In P. A. Teltser (ed.), Evolutionary Archaeology: Methodological Issues. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, pp. 13-32.
Kelly, R. C. (1977). Etoro Social Structure: A Study in Structural Contradiction. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Kroeber, A. L., and C. Kluckhohn. (1952). Culture: A Critical Review of Concepts and Definitions. Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 47(1).

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Darwin and Archaeology: A Handbook of Key Concepts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Table of Key Words xv
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Adaptation 15
  • References 26
  • Chapter 3 - Biological Constraints 29
  • References 46
  • Chapter 4 - Cause 49
  • References 65
  • Chapter 5 - Classification 69
  • Chapter 6 - Complexity 89
  • Chapter 7 - Culture 107
  • References 123
  • Chapter 8 - Descent 125
  • Chapter 9 - History 143
  • Chapter 10 - Individuals 161
  • References 180
  • Chapter 11 - Learning 183
  • References 198
  • Chapter 12 - Models 201
  • Chapter 13 - Natural Selection 225
  • Chapter 14 - Population 243
  • About the Contributors 257
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