Darwin and Archaeology: A Handbook of Key Concepts

By John P. Hart; John Edward Terrell et al. | Go to book overview

However, a prerequisite of this improved understanding is the recognition that continuity of material culture environments—for example, the presence of ceramic vessels of particular kind—is insufficient in itself to account for the continuity of cultural traditions in many spheres of social life. It is not possible to make a cake simply on the basis of looking at one and tasting it. It is necessary to see how it is done and thus acquire a “procedural template.” Whatever the specific psychological mechanism of the “handing-on” process, traditions must be taught and learned if the behavior patterns and beliefs of later generations are to resemble those of earlier ones, as they so often do.


REFERENCES
Boesch, C. (1993). Aspects of transmission of tool-use in wild chimpanzees. In K. R. Gibson and T. Ingold (eds.), Tools, Language and Cognition in Human Evolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 171-183.
Boesch, C., and M. Tomasello. (1998). Chimpanzee and human cultures. Current Anthropology 39: 591-604.
Box, H. O., and K. R. Gibson (eds.). (1999). Mammalian Social Learning: Comparative and Ecological Perspectives. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Boyd, R., and P. Richerson. (1985). Culture and the Evolutionary Process. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Boyd, R., and P. Richerson. (1988). An evolutionary model of social learning: The effects of spatial and temporal variation. In T. R. Zentall and B. G. Galef (eds.), Social Learning: Psychological and Biological Perspectives. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, pp. 29-48.
Boyd, R., and P. Richerson. (1996). Why culture is common but cultural evolution is rare. In W. G. Runciman, J. Maynard-Smith, and R.I.M. Dunbar (eds.), Evolution of Social Behaviour Patterns in Primates and Man. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 77-93.
Boyd, R., and P. Richerson. (1999). Memes: Universal acid or a better mousetrap? Paper presented at King's College, Cambridge, Conference on Memes, June 1999.
Cavalli-Sforza, L. L., and M. W. Feldman. (1981). Cultural Transmission and Evolution: A Quantitative Approach. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
Collard, M., and S. J. Shennan. (2000). Processes of culture change in prehistory: A case study from the European Neolithic. In C. Renfrew and K. Boyle (eds.), Archaeogenetics: DNA and the Population Prehistory of Europe. Cambridge: MacDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, pp. 89-97.
Coy, M. W. (ed.). (1989). Apprenticeship: From Theory to Method and Back Again. Albany: State University of New York Press.
Cullen, B. (1996). Social interaction and viral phenomena. In J. Steele and S. J. Shennan (eds.), The Archaeology of Human Ancestry: Power, Sex and Tradition. London: Routledge, pp. 420-433.
Dawkins, R. (1976). The Selfish Gene. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

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Darwin and Archaeology: A Handbook of Key Concepts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Table of Key Words xv
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Adaptation 15
  • References 26
  • Chapter 3 - Biological Constraints 29
  • References 46
  • Chapter 4 - Cause 49
  • References 65
  • Chapter 5 - Classification 69
  • Chapter 6 - Complexity 89
  • Chapter 7 - Culture 107
  • References 123
  • Chapter 8 - Descent 125
  • Chapter 9 - History 143
  • Chapter 10 - Individuals 161
  • References 180
  • Chapter 11 - Learning 183
  • References 198
  • Chapter 12 - Models 201
  • Chapter 13 - Natural Selection 225
  • Chapter 14 - Population 243
  • About the Contributors 257
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