Perpetration-Induced Traumatic Stress: The Psychological Consequences of Killing

By Rachel M. MacNair | Go to book overview

Chapter 10

Research Agenda

EXPANDING ON PREVIOUS FINDINGS

Various findings that require further research have been mentioned throughout this book. The essential case that PTSD is in fact a result of perpetration is still to be more firmly established. That it is present in certain groups and not in others needs much more clarification. The case was most strong in the group of combat veterans, since data included a large stratified random sample of veterans of a very large, long-lasting war. However, the data were cross-sectional, gathered at one point years after the war, employed self-report with no verification, and—most importantly—utilized questions not designed to actually look at whether or not PTSD can result from perpetration. In each other group, this book has simply offered a literature review upon which to base further investigation.

Matters of pattern and of implication also need extensive confirmation and expansion. There is a wide range of questions on rage, lifetime and current phases, concentration and memory problems, intrusive imagery, and a sense of personal disintegration. Do these vary across different types of groups, or with differing circumstances within groups? Do they have implications for therapy and other kinds of treatment? Are there implications for causation of symptoms? Have symptoms had social and historical impacts?


CONTEXT

Demographic variables such as gender, race, different ethnic groups, cultures, and subcultures may prove fruitful for future research. Physical, cultural, ex-

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Perpetration-Induced Traumatic Stress: The Psychological Consequences of Killing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents vi
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 - Perpetration-Induced Traumatic Stress 1
  • References 12
  • Chapter 2 - Combat Veterans 13
  • Chapter 3 - Executioners 31
  • Chapter 4 - A Historical Case: the Nazis 45
  • Chapter 5 - Both Sides of Law Enforcement 57
  • Chapter 6 - Is It Violence?: Abortion Practitioners 71
  • Chapter 7 - Other Groups to Study 83
  • Chapter 8 - Implications for Psychology 91
  • Chapter 9 - Social Implications 109
  • References 125
  • Chapter 10 - Research Agenda 127
  • Chapter 11 - Technical Aspects of Research 147
  • Chapter 12 - Conclusion 161
  • Appendix - Statistics from the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study 173
  • Bibliography 183
  • Index 193
  • About the Author 199
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