An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945-1996

By John E. Jessup | Go to book overview

F

Fabião, Carlos.
On 25 November 1975, a state of emergency was declared in Lisbon Military District of Portugal following days of violent demonstrations against the provisional government. The provisional government had been formed by the Armed Forces Movement (AFM) when the fourth coalition government fell on 17 July. On 21 November, the rioting had forced the AFM provisional government to suspend operations. By 24 November, fighting had broken out between government forces and communist rebels in and around Lisbon. The next day President Francisco da Costa Gomes declared the state of emergency. When order had been restored on 27 November, the president dismissed a number of senior left-wing military officers, including the Army chief of staff, General Carlos Fabião, and Admiral Antonio Rosa Coutinho. Coutinho's ouster sparked new rioting in which left-wing rebels captured four air force bases in northern and central Portugal. Order was quickly restored (28 November).

Fadlallah, Muhammad Husayn.
The spiritual leader of Hizbullah (qv), a Lebanese religious (Sh'ia) terrorist organization, Muhammad Husayn Fadlallah, was assassinated on 8 March 1985, when a bomb planted in his automobile detonated in front of his house in south Beirut. Eighty people were killed in the blast, and another 250 injured. An estimated 250 kilograms of explosive were used in the bomb. No one claimed credit for the attack.

Fahd ibn 'Abd al-'Aziz al-Saud.
(b. 1922, Riyadh) On 13 June 1982, King Khalid ibn Abd-Aziz (qv) of Saudi Arabia died. Crown Prince Fahd, Khalid's half-brother, immediately succeeded him to the throne and became prime minister at the same time. Fahd was born the first son of Ibn Saud (qv) and his second wife, Hassa Sudairi. Fahd was proclaimed crown prince when Khalid took the throne upon the murder of King Faisal (qv) (1975). Fahd's reign was marked by the modernization of Saudi Arabian life, including new airports. Fahd also attempted a Middle East solution, but without much success. Fahd led his country through the Gulf crisis in 1991, when his country was the base for the Desert Storm operation.

-197-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945-1996
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface xi
  • Some Notes on Using This Work xiii
  • Bibliographical Note xv
  • A 1
  • B 49
  • C 101
  • D 147
  • E 173
  • F 197
  • G 223
  • H 269
  • I 299
  • J 353
  • K 371
  • L 415
  • M 439
  • N 501
  • O 541
  • P 557
  • Q 603
  • R 609
  • S 637
  • T 719
  • U 767
  • V 783
  • W 797
  • X 813
  • Y 815
  • Z 825
  • Index 839
  • About the Author 888
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 890

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.