An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945-1996

By John E. Jessup | Go to book overview

N

Nabatiya.
See Lebanon.

Nablus (Nabulus or Shekem).
See Jordan and Israel.

al-Nabulis, Sulaiman.
On 10 April 1957, King Hussein of Jordan dismissed his pro-Egyptian premier, Sulaiman al-Nabulis, as a first step in purging his government of sympathizers of Egypt's Gamal Nasser (qv), who were apparently plotting a coup against the king.

Naftali.
See Israel.

Nagaland.
See India.

Nag Hammadi (Naj' Hammadi) Hydroelectric Plant.
See Egypt.

Naguib, Mohammed.
(b. 20 February 1901, Khartoum, Sudan—d. 28 August 1984, Cairo [?]) Serving in the army before World War II, Naguib rose to the rank of brigadier by the time of the 1948 war against Israel. Wounded in that conflict, he was promoted to major general in 1951. In 1952, he was elected president of the Egyptian Army Officers Club over the candidate sponsored by King Farouk (qv). During that period he had come into favor with Gamal Nasser (qv) and was asked to be a figurehead leader (under Nasser) in the Free Officers' Movement. In August 1952, Nasser turned over the leadership of the group to Naguib. Naguib resented the implications of this position, and a rift developed between him and Nasser. When the Free Officers' group engineered the overthrow of Farouk (26 July 1952), they made the popular Naguib the president. When the republic was declared in June 1953, a dispute erupted over whether Nasser should be made prime minister, As a compromise, Nasser was appointed deputy prime minister. As president, Naguib wanted to return to constitutional government as quickly as possible, but the revolutionary council had not yet completed its eradication of the opponents still alive from the old regime. In February 1954, Naguib resigned the presidency but was prevailed upon to continue in office. After an assassination attempt against Nasser failed (Naguib probably had no part in it) on 14 November 1954, Nasser grabbed control. Naguib was deprived of his presidency and placed under house arrest until 1970, when he was released by president Anwar Sadat (qv). Thereafter, he faded into obscurity until his death in 1984.

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An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945-1996
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface xi
  • Some Notes on Using This Work xiii
  • Bibliographical Note xv
  • A 1
  • B 49
  • C 101
  • D 147
  • E 173
  • F 197
  • G 223
  • H 269
  • I 299
  • J 353
  • K 371
  • L 415
  • M 439
  • N 501
  • O 541
  • P 557
  • Q 603
  • R 609
  • S 637
  • T 719
  • U 767
  • V 783
  • W 797
  • X 813
  • Y 815
  • Z 825
  • Index 839
  • About the Author 888
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