An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945-1996

By John E. Jessup | Go to book overview

O

Oanh, Nguyen Xuan.
On 29 August 1964, a civilian Harvard-trained economist, Dr. Nguyen Xuan Oanh, took control of the government of South Vietnam. This action was at the behest of the ruling triumvirate that took over after Lieutenant General Nguyen Khanh (qv) resigned the presidency on 27 August after suffering an apparent physical and nervous breakdown. The new president stated he would head the government for two months. He was replaced by a “rested and recovered” General Khanh on 3 September. Khanh was later replaced by Tran Van Houng (qv), who was in turn ousted by Khanh on 27 January 1965. The next day, Nguyen Xuan Oanh was appointed premier and remained in that post until 16 February.

Oatis, William.
On 4 July 1951, William Oatis, an American journalist, was convicted of espionage in Czechoslovakia. On 21 July the U.S. government officially requested that Oatis be released to American custody. When the request was denied, the U.S. initiated diplomatic reprisals.

Obasanjo, Olusegun.
(b. 5 March 1937, Abeokuta, Nigeria) Born into the Yoruba tribe, Obasanjo was raised a Baptist; he enlisted in the army in 1958. He trained at the Mons Military Cadet School in England and was commissioned in 1959. He later attended the Indian Staff College and the Royal Military College of Science at Shrivenham and the Royal College of Defense Studies, London, England. He served with the UN command in Congo in 1960 and in the Nigerian civil war in 1969, where he commanded a marine commando unit. After the war he became chief of engineers and also served as minister of works and housing. In 1975, as armed forces chief of staff, he became premier when the government of Yakubu Mohamm Gowon was ousted from power, and Murtala Ramat Mohammed became head of state. On 13 February 1974, a military coup attempt failed in Nigeria. Mohammed was killed in the fighting, however, and Lieutenant General Obasanjo took control of the country (14 February). Obasanjo remained in power until 1 October 1979, when a duly elected new president, Alhaji Shehu Shagari (qv), was installed.

Obiang Nguema Mbasogo, Teodoro.
On 3 August 1979, the government of the president of Equatorial Guinea, Francisco Macias Nguema, was deposed in a coup led by his nephew, Lieutenant Colonel Teodoro Obiang Nguema. Obiang

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