Politics, Language, and Culture: A Critical Look at Urban School Reform

By Joseph W. Check | Go to book overview

Selected Bibliography
Ackerman, Richard, Patricia Maslin-Ostrowski, and Charles Christensen. “Case Stories: Telling Tales About School.” Educational Leadership 53, no. 6 (1996): 21-23.
Anderson, Gary L. “Toward Authentic Participation: Deconstructing the Discourses of Participatory Reforms in Education.” American Educational Research Journal 35 (1998): 571-603.
Applebee, Arthur. Contexts for Learning to Write: Studies of Secondary School Instruction. Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing, 1984.
Batton, Barbara and Linda Vereline. Literacy Practices at C. E. S. 28 and C. J. H. S. 117. New York: Institute for Literacy Studies, 1997.
Berliner, David and Bruce Biddle. The Manufactured Crisis: Myths, Fraud, and the Attack on America's Public Schools. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1995.
Carini, Patricia F. Observation and Description: An Alternative Methodology for the Investigation of Human Phenomena. Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota Press, 1975.
Calhoun, Emily F. How to Use Action Research in the Self-renewing School. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1994.
Check, Joe. (1997) “Teacher Research as Powerful Professional Development.” The Harvard Education Letter XIII, no. 3 (1997): 6-8.
Chenoweth Tom. “Emerging National Models of Schooling for At-risk Students.” International Journal of Educational Reform 1, no. 3 (1992): 255-69.
Collier, Virginia P. “Age and Rate of Acquisition of Second Language for Academic Purposes.” TESOL Quarterly 21, (1987): 617-41.
Cremin, Lawrence A. Popular Education and Its Discontents, New York: Harper and Row, 1990.
Cummins, Jim. Negotiating Identities: Education for Empowerment in a Diverse Society. Ontario, CA: California Association for Bilingual Education, 1996.

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