HRD in a Complex World

Edited by Monica Lee

LONDON AND NEW YORK

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HRD in a Complex World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Routledge Studies in Human Resource Development ii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Notes on Contributors xi
  • Acknowledgements xvi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - The Depth 5
  • 1 - The Complex Roots of Hrd 7
  • References 21
  • 2 - Towards a Viable Systems Approach to Learning, Development and Change 25
  • References 40
  • 3 - Worldviews That Enhance and Inhibit Hrd's Social Responsibility 42
  • References 54
  • 4 - Strategic Quest and the Search for the Primal Mother 57
  • Part II - The Width 67
  • 5 - A 'Fourth Paradigm' 69
  • References 81
  • 6 - The Ethics of Hrd 83
  • References 98
  • 7 - The Paradoxical Role of Hrd 100
  • Notes 112
  • References 113
  • 8 - The Urge to Destroy is a Creative Urge 117
  • References 127
  • Part III - Applying the Theories 129
  • 9 - The Use of Visualisation Technology 131
  • References 144
  • 10 - Complexifying Organisational Development and Hrd 147
  • References 163
  • 11 - A New Perception for a New Millennium 166
  • 12 - Individual Learning from Exceptional Events 179
  • References 192
  • Part IV - Aspects of Practice 193
  • 13 - Challenges for Health Services 195
  • 14 - Propositions for Incorporating a Pedagogy of Complexity, Emotion and Power in Hrd Education 204
  • References 215
  • 15 - The Line Manager as a Facilitator of Team Learning and Change 218
  • References 227
  • 16 - A Case of Internalized Complexity? 231
  • References 240
  • Index 243
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