Lifestyle Marketing: Reaching the New American Consumer

By Ronald D. Michman; Edward M. Mazze et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5

Subcultural Segmentation and Targeting Changing Lifestyles of the Singles Market

Subcultural influences on consumer behavior are the values, customs, and traditions peculiar to a particular group. Subcultures or microcultures are not necessarily monolithic, even though there may be similarities, but instead often composed of various subsegments. Individuals may view the subsegment as only a slight influence while others find its influence a dominant force on their buyer behavior. Subcultures are delineated by geographic areas, religion, ethnic and cultural ties, and age.

Many cities have populations largely composed of nationality groups such as Cuban communities in Florida, Mexican-Americans in El Paso, Texas, Puerto Ricans in New York City, Asian-Americans in San Francisco, and African-Americans in Washington, D.C. Some individuals in these groups become acculturated while others retain their ethnic identity and might be reluctant to speak English.

Religious groups also provide important influences on consumer behavior. Many Seventh Day Adventists limit their purchases of meat and are targets for vegetable-based foods. The Jewish subculture desires products with kosher certification as do other subcultures who prefer to buy kosher chicken and hot dogs.

Age groups, such as singles, teens, and the elderly are also subcultures. Products intended for one subculture may sometimes flow into the general population or macroculture. For example, the growth of single-person households has led to single-size serving packages, smaller kitchen appliances, and frozen dinners. These products are

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