Nuclear Weapons and Law

By Arthur Selwyn Miller; Martin Feinrider | Go to book overview

25.

In Brief Rejoinder *

Arthur Selwyn Miller

The editors of the Nova Law Journal have invited me to comment upon the responses that were received to my preliminary foray into the applicability of constitutional norms to nuclear weapons. I am happy to do so. 1 At the outset, I should like to express my deep appreciation to those who took time from their busy schedules to write responses, as well as the editors of this Journal for making the symposium possible. It is, I believe, the first attempt by a legal periodical to tackle from a constitutional standpoint what by all odds is the overriding moral and political (and thus constitutional) question of the day.

Lawyers of whatever specialty have until quite recent times ignored the problems attendant to the manufacture, storage, deployment and possible—even probable—use of weapons that threaten the very fabric of civilization as we know it. Now, however, two groups of lawyers have been formed—one with Boston headquarters and the other centered in New York City; members of the American Bar Association, as well as other bar associations, are beginning to focus upon the growing peril. That is all to the good: lawyers, as Professor Levinson suggests, can play an important role in the developing dialogue. They exemplify in modern version what Samuel Johnson said long ago: “Depend upon it, Sir, when any man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.” 2 For the first time since Hiroshima and Nagasaki were all but obliterated in August, 1945, the minds of lawyers—some but far from all of them—are beginning to concentrate upon what Jonathan Schell has called “the fate of the earth.” 3

* Reprinted, with permission, from Nova Law Journal, Volume 7, Number 1 (1982).

1. Although mention will be made of several responses, this rejoinder is general in nature. It seeks to extend the argument, rather than to comment upon each of the responses in detail.

2. 6 J.BOSWELL, THE LIFE OF SAMUEL JOHNSON 309 (W. Crocker ed. 1846) (1st ed. London 1791).

3. J.SCHELL, THE FATE OF THE EARTH (1982).

-377-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nuclear Weapons and Law
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 419

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.