Multicultural Writers from Antiquity to 1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

By Alba Amoia; Bettina L.Knapp | Go to book overview

CH'OE CH'IWŎN

(857-?)

Maurizio Riotto


BIOGRAPHY

Ch'oe Ch'iwŏn, one of Korea's greatest scholars, wrote under the pseudonym Koun (Solitary cloud). (Signature under a pseudonym is still today a common practice among Korean men of letters.) The Samguk sagi, a historic work completed in 1145, provides some information about Ch'oe's life. Accordingly, we know that he probably came from Kyŏngju, the capital of the kingdom of Silla, and that he was undoubtedly a precocious child of exceptional versatility. At the young age of twelve he was sent by his parents to study in China, in accordance with the widespread custom among the Korean literati of the past. Apparently, before he left for China, his father, who had intuited his enormous talent, threatened to disown him as his son if he did not distinguish himself in his studies. After only eight years of instruction, he passed the Chinese state examinations and obtained an administrative post (even foreigners could do so at that time in China), but resigned after a year in order to devote himself to further study. After three years of hunger and hardship, he finally was helped by a government official named Gao Pian, who assigned him a job in his own office. At the age of twenty-eight, Ch'oe returned to his native land. Certainly those long years spent in China marked his entire life, implanting in him notions of multiculturalism that would render him one of the most productive and open-minded Korean writers.

Returning to his homeland, he immediately became immersed in the heavy political climate that would soon bring about the end of the dynasty and the dissolution of the kingdom of Silla. Nevertheless, he succeeded in holding several important public positions and in 893 was named ambassador to China, a post he was prevented from reaching by bands of brigands infesting the territory of Silla, which was now on the brink of collapse.

In 894 he sent a petition to the queen, Chinsŏng (887-897), in which he

-64-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Multicultural Writers from Antiquity to 1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 497

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.