Multicultural Writers from Antiquity to 1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

By Alba Amoia; Bettina L.Knapp | Go to book overview

biography Fanny Lewald (1996), characterizes Lewald as a young lady of Jewish origin who became Protestant and fought for the emancipation of the bourgeoisie, Jews, and women. She sees Lewald's life and work as that of an influential woman who disdained traditions and conventions—exemplary for bourgeois intellectuals of her time.


SELECTIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY

Works by Lewald

Römisches Tagebuch 1845/46. Leipzig: Klinkhardt & Biermann, 1927.
Italienisches Bilderbuch (1847). Ed. Ulrike Helmer. Frankfurt am Main: Ulrike Helmer Publishers, 1992.
Erinnerungen aus dem Jahre 1848. In Freiheit des Herzens. Ed. Günter de Bruyn and Gerhard Wolf. Frankfurt am Main and Berlin: Ullstein, 1992.
Meine Lebensgeschichte (1861-1862). In Freiheit des Herzens. Ed. Günter de Bruyn and Gerhard Wolf. Frankfurt am Main and Berlin: Ullstein, 1992.
Stahr, Adolf, and Fanny Lewald. Ein Winter in Rom. Berlin: J. Guttentag, 1869.
Reisebriefe aus Deutschland, Italien, und Frankreich(1877-1878). Berlin: Otto Janke, 1880.

Selective Studies of Lewald

Maio, Irene S. di. “Reclamation of the French Revolution: Fanny Lewald's Literary Response of the Nachmärz in Der Seehof.” In Geist und Gesellschaft: Zur deutschen Rezeption der Französischen Revolution. Ed. Eitel Timm. Munich: Fink, 1990.
Mortier, Roland. “Une romanciere spectatrice de la Revolution française de 1848.” In Littérature et culture allemandes: Hommages a Henri Plard. Ed. Roger Goffin, Michel Vanhelleputte, and Monique Weyembergh-Boussart. Bruxelles: Editions de l'Université de Bruxelles, 1985.
Schneider, Gabriele. Fanny Lewald. Rowohlts Monographien, 553. Reinbek bei Hamburg: Rowohlt Taschenbuch Verlag, 1996.

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