Multicultural Writers from Antiquity to 1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

By Alba Amoia; Bettina L.Knapp | Go to book overview
Save to active project

AMEEN F.RIHANI

(1876-1940)

Ameen Albert Rihani


BIOGRAPHY

Born in Freike, Lebanon, Ameen Rihani was one of six children and the oldest son of Ferris Rihani, who was engaged in raw-silk manufacturing. The father's commercial ambitions attracted him to America, where he sent his brother and Ameen first and then followed a year later. The twelve-year-old immigrant was placed in a school outside New York City, where he learned the rudiments of English. His father and uncle set up shop in a small cellar in lower Manhattan, using the boy's indispensable knowledge of English for the family business. His first readings in the cellar introduced him to William Shakespeare and Victor Hugo, but in time he became familiar with many of Europe's greatest writers. Endowed with a natural talent for eloquent speaking, in 1895 the stagestruck teenager joined a touring stock company headed by Henry Jewet (who later opened a theater in Boston), but during the summer of that year the troupe became stranded in Kansas City, Missouri, and the prodigal son returned to his father. He was determined, however, not to rejoin the business but to insist on following a regular course of study that would lead to a professional career. The choice having fallen on law, Rihani attended night school for a year, then entered law school in 1897. But a lung infection soon interrupted his studies, requiring his return to Lebanon to recover.

Back in his homeland he taught English in a clerical school in exchange for lessons in his native Arabic tongue. He read Arab and other Eastern poets and especially the forerunner of Omar Khayyam, Abul-'Ala', some of whose quatrains he would translate into English and publish in 1903. Returning to New York in 1899, he joined several literary and artistic societies and contributed regularly to the Arabic weekly Al-Huda, published in New York. His first published work in Arabic was a treatise on the French Revolution entitled Nubtha fith-thowra-t-Famnciya (1902).

-352-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Multicultural Writers from Antiquity to 1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 497

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.