Documents of American Diplomacy: From the American Revolution to the Present

By Michael D. Gambone | Go to book overview

Part Three

The Civil War

The costliest war—the Civil War—in U.S. history also presented the country with significant consequences in the international forum. While the leaders in Washington, D.C., and Richmond, Virginia, contemplated campaigns on a scale unprecedented in modern warfare, American rivals prepared to exploit the distractions created by civil war. As armies numbering hundreds of thousands endured battles that dwarfed Waterloo, the United States found its survival challenged by formidable powers outside its borders.

The internecine war between Liberals and Conservatives in Mexico left the door open for foreign intervention. Citing uncompensated losses for property destroyed during the civil strife and Mexico's refusal to pay its foreign debt, England, France, and Spain demanded satisfaction. All three powers agreed to a joint intervention in October 1861 and occupied the port of Veracruz three months later. While Mexican leaders were able to reach an agreement with England and Spain, the French remained to carve out a new part of their empire. For years, Napoleon III had eyed the Western Hemisphere, entertaining designs that would expand French imperial power and his prestige. To achieve this, he dispatched the Archduke Maximilian of Hapsburg (brother of the Austrian Emperor Franz Josef) to Mexico. 1

In the early stages of the war, few Europeans expected that the American union would survive. Although the industrial resources and the population base of the North appeared more than adequate to protect the remainder of the United States from a Confederate victory, significant doubts existed as to whether the Union could muster the means necessary to reunite the country. It was an open question whether it was possible for northern armies to prevail in a continent where the distance from Washington, D.C. to New Orleans was greater than that from Berlin to Moscow. 2

President Lincoln's most pressing diplomatic priority was to bide time adequate enough to stave off either foreign support of the Confederacy or open

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Documents of American Diplomacy: From the American Revolution to the Present
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 580

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.