Economics of College Sports

By John Fizel; Rodney Fort | Go to book overview

13

Is There a Short Supply of Tall People in the College Game?

David J. Berri


INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this paper is to investigate competitive balance across three team sports played under the auspices of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. On the surface, such a topic appears quite straightforward. The reader should be warned, though, that the discussion of this straightforward topic will take a long and winding road till it reaches its final destinations. The road will begin, not in college, but with a review of the level of competitive balance achieved by a variety of professional team sports. From professional sports we will move on to a brief discussion of two apparently unrelated topics, macroeconomics and evolutionary biology. Only after such side trips will we return to the topic of interest, competitive balance in college sports.


THE SHORT SUPPLY OF TALL PEOPLE IN THE PRO GAME

Competitive balance in team sports is typically examined for an individual sport, with the primary topic being the impact various institutions and policies have upon the dispersion of wins. 1 Inter-sport comparisons, in contrast, are not frequently offered. An exception to this general trend is the seminal work of Quirk and Fort (1994). 2 who did offer measures of competitive balance 3 for the four major North American professional team sports leagues:

-211-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economics of College Sports
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 263

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.