Qaddafi, Terrorism, and the Origins of the U.S. Attack on Libya

By Brian L. Davis | Go to book overview

3

The United States and Libya on a Collision Course

Seven days after his inauguration, in a brief but widely reported passage in a speech welcoming the American hostages home from Iran, President Ronald Reagan had declared:

Let terrorists be aware that when the rules of international behavior are violated, our policy will be one of swift and effective retribution. We hear it said that we live in an era of a limit to our powers. Well, let it also be understood, there are limits to our patience. 1

It was a vow that the president would find difficult to keep. The inspiration for the promise of “swift and effective retribution” was obviously the military reprisal policy of Israel. Israel, however, a small country with few friends and little to lose, has a strong national consensus on the use of military force, a press subject to censorship in military matters, a geographical location close to the bases of its terrorist enemies, an overseas presence not so ubiquitous as to give terrorists targets to attack literally anywhere in the world, and a significant degree of endurance in its national character. In every one of these aspects Israel was antithetical to the United States. Reagan's promise of retaliation against terrorism nonetheless took on a significance of its own.


THE REAGAN ADMINISTRATION BESET BY TERRORISM

When the Reagan administration deployed Marines in West Beirut in 1982 it had not realized that it had fallen into a trap that would bring great humiliation

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Qaddafi, Terrorism, and the Origins of the U.S. Attack on Libya
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Muammar Al-Qaddafi, Leader of the Revolution 1
  • 2 - The United States and Libya, 1969-1983 33
  • 3 - The United States and Libya on a Collision Course 57
  • 4 - Operation Prairie Fire 101
  • 5 - The La Belle Discotheque Bombing and Its Aftermath 115
  • 6 - Operation El Dorado Canyon and Its Aftermath 133
  • Appendix 181
  • Bibliographical Essay 191
  • Index 193
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.