Qaddafi, Terrorism, and the Origins of the U.S. Attack on Libya

By Brian L. Davis | Go to book overview

Appendix

The Qaddafi Regime on Terrorism: A Sampling

June 11, 1972. In his annual speech commemorating the American evacuation of Wheelus Field in Tripoli, Qaddafi declared “Britain and the United States will pay dearly for the wrongs and perfidy they inflicted on us” and announced his intention to “fight Britain and United States on their own lands” (New York Times [hereafter cited as NYT], 12 June 1972). He boasted, “We are helping the Irish to put a thorn in Britain's flesh and make her pay dearly” (NYT, 13 June 1972). “At present we support the revolutionaries of Ireland, who oppose Britain and are motivated by nationalism and religion…. There are arms and there is support” (Shlomi Elad and Ariel Merari, The Soviet Bloc and World Terrorism, Jaffee Center for Strategic Studies Paper, no. 26 [Tel Aviv: Jaffee Center for Strategic Studies, Tel Aviv University, 1984], p. 24). Furthermore, said Qaddafi, “We declared here today that any Arab from the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf wishing to volunteer …[for Palestinian terrorist groups] can register his name at any Libyan embassy and will be given adequate training for combat” (Washington Post; [hereafter cited as WP], 12 June 1972); financial aid for such groups was also promised (NYT, 12 June 1972).

October 7, 1972. Referring to the Japanese Red Army's Lod Airport attack, in which mostly Christian pilgrims from Puerto Rico were massacred, Qaddafi in a speech stated, “Indeed, feda'yin [guerrilla] action must be of the type of the operation carried out by the Japanese feda'yin…. We demand that feda'i action be able to carry out operations similar to the operation carried out by the Japanese. Why should a Palestinian not carry out such an operation?” (Steve Posner, Israel Undercover: Secret Warfare and Hidden Diplomacy in the Middle East [Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1987], pp. 82-83).

Early 1970s. In the hagiography Gaddafi: Voice from the Desert by Mirella Bianco (London: Longman, 1975), Qaddafi was quoted as saying, “If we assist the Irish people it is simply because here we see a small people still under the yoke of Great Britain and fighting to free themselves from it. And it must be remembered that the revolutionaries

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Qaddafi, Terrorism, and the Origins of the U.S. Attack on Libya
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Muammar Al-Qaddafi, Leader of the Revolution 1
  • 2 - The United States and Libya, 1969-1983 33
  • 3 - The United States and Libya on a Collision Course 57
  • 4 - Operation Prairie Fire 101
  • 5 - The La Belle Discotheque Bombing and Its Aftermath 115
  • 6 - Operation El Dorado Canyon and Its Aftermath 133
  • Appendix 181
  • Bibliographical Essay 191
  • Index 193
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