Qaddafi, Terrorism, and the Origins of the U.S. Attack on Libya

By Brian L. Davis | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Essay

Information on developments relating to Libya can be found in the several leading prestige newspapers of the United States and Great Britain, as well as the Washington Times, which takes a special interest in Libya and terrorism. The Foreign Broadcast Information Service Daily Reports, Middle East and Africa (since mid-1987, Near East and South Asia), are an excellent primary source; included are many of Muammar al-Qaddafi's speeches, a rich resource (in contrast to his frequent interviews with Western correspondents, in which he seldom says anything new or different). The International Security Council (Washington, D.C.) publishes Focus on Libya, a monthly newsletter. Intriguing coverage of Libya was found in the Islamic fundamentalist monthly Arabia: The Islamic World Review (London, 1981-87), including a June 1984 cover story. In the pages of Arabia (which was funded by the government of Saudi Arabia, but was far more enamored of the theocratic regime of Iran) Qaddafi was detested for his heresies and his persecution of conservative Muslims in Libya and his downfall was hopefully awaited.

Two useful Department of State white papers are “The Libyan Problem, Department of State Bulletin 83 (Oct. 1983):71-78, and Libya under Qadhafi: A Pattern of Aggression, Special Report No. 138 (1986), the latter containing appendices on Abu Nidal and on selected violent incidents attributed to Libya from 1979 to 1985. The following are two pertinent congressional hearings: U.S. Congress, Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Security and Terrorism, Libyan-Sponsored Terrorism: A Dilemma for Policymakers, 19 Feb. 1986, 99th Cong., 2d sess.; and U.S. Congress, House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Subcommittee on Arms Control, International Security, and Science, War Powers, Libya, and State-Sponsored Terrorism, 29 Apr.-15 May 1986, 99th Cong., 2d sess.

Extensive Defense Department testimony on the April 15, 1986, air strikes is found in U.S. Congress, House Committee on Appropriations, Department of Defense Appropriations for 1987, 99th Cong., 2d sess., 1986, pp. 680-725. Detailed military accounts

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