The Age of Milton: An Encyclopedia of Major 17th-Century British and American Authors

By Alan Hager | Go to book overview

Richard Lovelace
(1618-1657)

THOMAS HOWARD CROFTS III


BIOGRAPHY

The poet Richard Lovelace was a scion of an old Kentish family that distinguished itself in the court of Elizabeth I. His great-grandfather, Sir William, Sergeant-at-Law, represented Canterbury in Parliament in 1562 and 1572. The following Sir William, the poet's grandfather, was knighted either by Queen Elizabeth or the Earl of Essex in Dublin in 1599. The poet's father, called Sir William of Woolwich (knighted by James I in 1609), was an outstanding soldier in the Low Countries. At the age of forty-four, Sir William was killed at the siege of Groll in Holland (1627), leaving his widow Anne (née Barne) in charge of their eight children: Richard, Thomas, Francis, William, Dudley Posthumus, Anne, Elizabeth, and Johanna. To Richard fell a great portion of his father's and grandfather's estates.

Lovelace matriculated at Gloucester Hall, Oxford, in 1634. While there he wrote and had produced a comedy entitled The Scholar (or The Scholars) of which only the prologue and epilogue survive. After only two years, Lovelace—apparently by means of the intervention of one of Queen Henrietta's ladies—was created Master of Arts. The next year Lovelace was in residence at Cambridge where he made the acquaintance of Andrew Marvell. About 1639, Lovelace “retired in great splendour” (Wilkinson xx) to Charles's court, where he soon found soldierly occupation, following George, Lord Goring, on both Scottish campaigns (i.e., in the Bishops' Wars of 1639 and 1640). During the second expedition, he wrote a play, The Soldier, which was apparently suppressed and, at any rate, is not extant; at this time he also wrote the lines “To Generall Goring, after the pacification of Berwicke.”

Returning from the North, Lovelace repaired to his ancestral properties in Kent and was active in the not-inconsequential politics of that region. In 1642 he presented the Royalist Kentish to Parliament, thereby aligning himself with such notorious Royalist upstarts as Sir Edmund Dering (whose own such petition had already landed him in jail). For this offense, Lovelace was imprisoned in Westminster Gatehouse from April

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The Age of Milton: An Encyclopedia of Major 17th-Century British and American Authors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Timeline of Major 17th-Century British and American Authors xvii
  • (1672-1719) 1
  • (1555-1626) 6
  • (1666-1731) 10
  • (1626-1697) 14
  • (1561-1626) 19
  • Bibliography 23
  • (1640?-1689) 25
  • (1649-1708) 29
  • (1627-1691) 32
  • Bibliography 38
  • (1612-1672) 39
  • Bibliography 41
  • (1605-1682) 42
  • Bibliography 47
  • (1628-1688) 48
  • (1577-1640) 53
  • (1612/1613-1680) 57
  • Bibliography 60
  • (1567-1620) 61
  • Bibliography 64
  • (C. 1595-1639) 65
  • (C. 1585-1639) 68
  • (1623-1673) 71
  • Bibliography 73
  • (1559?-1634) 74
  • (1656-1710) 78
  • Bibliography 80
  • (1613-1658) 81
  • (1653-1713) 85
  • (1618-1667) 89
  • Bibliography 92
  • (C. 1613-1649) 93
  • Bibliography 96
  • (1599-1658) 98
  • (1606-1668) 103
  • (1658-1734) 109
  • Bibliography 111
  • (1572-1631) 112
  • (1563-1631) 118
  • Bibliography 121
  • (1631-1700) 122
  • (1608-1666) 128
  • (1661-1720) 133
  • Bibliography 136
  • (1582-1650) 137
  • (1586-1639?) 139
  • (1563-1639 and 1593-1652/1653) 144
  • Bibliography 146
  • (1554-1628) 147
  • Bibliography 157
  • (1578-1657) 158
  • (1593-1633) 162
  • (1591-1674) 167
  • (1588-1679) 172
  • (1572/1573-1637) 181
  • (1660-1685) 187
  • (1666-1727) 191
  • (C. 1634-1693) 194
  • (1569?-1645) 198
  • (1615-1657) 202
  • Bibliography 205
  • (1632-1704) 206
  • (1618-1657) 216
  • Bibliography 218
  • (1672?-1724) 219
  • Bibliography 222
  • (1621-1678) 223
  • Bibliography 226
  • (1583-1640) 228
  • Bibliography 231
  • (1580-1627) 232
  • (1608-1674) 237
  • (1652-1685) 244
  • (1633-1703) 248
  • (1632-1694) 253
  • Bibliography 258
  • (1659-1695) 260
  • Bibliography 265
  • (1686-1758) 267
  • (1606-1669) 270
  • Bibliography 273
  • (1647-1680) 274
  • (C. 1637-1711) 280
  • (1577-1640) 283
  • (C. 1642-1692) 287
  • (1671-1713) 292
  • (1564-1616) 296
  • (1632-1677) 312
  • (1608/1609-1642) 316
  • (1652-1715) 320
  • Bibliography 323
  • (1578-1653) 324
  • (1575?-1626) 328
  • (1636?-1674) 332
  • (1599-1641) 336
  • Bibliography 339
  • (1621?-1695) 340
  • (1599-1660) 344
  • (1632-1675) 348
  • (1606-1687) 352
  • Bibliography 354
  • (1579?-1633?) 355
  • (1568-1635) 360
  • (1641-1715) 365
  • List of Authors by Birth Year 373
  • Selected General Bibliography 377
  • Index 379
  • About the Editor and Contributors 389
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