Slavery in the South: A State-by-State History

By Clayton E. Jewett; John O. Allen | Go to book overview

Maryland

TIMELINE

1634-1635: Mathias de Souza and Francisco, mulatto servants of Father Andrew White, arrive in Maryland

1664: Slavery is legally defined—all blacks transported to Maryland are automatically considered slaves

1671: Statute is enacted declaring that baptism does not confer freedom on enslaved Africans

1698-1720s: Large numbers of Africans are imported into Maryland

1739-1740: Jack Ransom's slave conspiracy erupts in Prince George's County

1778: Maryland Quakers require members in good standing to sell their slaves

1780: Maryland enrolls slaves in its militia and Continental Line regiments

1783: Maryland bans the importation of slaves

1788, April 28: Maryland ratifies the U.S. Constitution and enters the Union

1790: Manumission statutes become legal and many Maryland slaves are legally freed as a result

1796: Free blacks are barred from voting and holding elective offices

-139-

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Slavery in the South: A State-by-State History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Timeline of Significant Events xxxi
  • Alabama 1
  • Arkansas 23
  • Delaware 35
  • District of Columbia 51
  • Florida 67
  • Georgia 81
  • Kentucky 97
  • Louisiana 121
  • Maryland 139
  • Mississippi 157
  • Missouri 173
  • North Carolina 185
  • South Carolina 205
  • Tennessee 223
  • Texas 237
  • Virginia 257
  • Appendix 1 281
  • Appendix 2 283
  • Appendix 3 285
  • Bibliography 289
  • Index 303
  • About the Authors 307
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