The Chinua Achebe Encyclopedia

By M. Keith Booker | Go to book overview

D

DAILY CHRONICLE

, a daily newspaper that serves as the official propaganda organ of the People's Organization Partyin AMan of the People.

M. Keith Booker


“DEAR TAI SOLARIN.”

Achebe essay. See Morning Yet on Creation Day.


DESTROYER OF COMPOUNDS

. African-born civil engineer in collusion with James Ikedi, the first warrant chief of Okperi in Arrow of God (chapter 5). Destroyer of Compounds is accused of extorting money from villages whose compounds supposedly lay on a planned roadway. By briefly mentioning characters of this ilk, Achebe invokes the early roots of Nigerian corruption, born of the warrant chief system (or certainly exacerbated by it).

Rachel R. Reynolds


DICK

, an Englishman visiting John Kent in Kangan in Anthills of the Savannah. He is the founding editor of Reject, a thriving poetry journal that publishes only poems already rejected by more mainstream literary journals. In chapter 13, we learn of an aerogram he sent to John Kent extolling the virtues of Ikem Osodi, whom he had just met during his visit to Kangan.

M. Keith Booker


DISTRICT COMMISSIONER

, pompous British colonial officer in Things Fall Apart, identified only by his official title. Responsible for overseeing the British system of indirect rule in the area of Umuofia, he is greatly disliked by the local people due to his heavy-handed approach in dealing with them and their customs. He is responsible for the treacherous imprisonment of Okonkwo and five other Igbo leaders who have been called to a meeting with him, presumably to air their grievances. At the end of Things Fall Apart, after the death of Okonkwo, he concludes that Okonkwo's story might make an interesting anecdote in the book he is writing, to be entitled The Pacification of the PrimitiveTribes of the Lower Niger. Not named in Things Fall Apart, the District Commissioner is identified in Arrow of God as George Allen. Arrow of God also includes a segment of Allen's book. See also Pacification.

M. Keith Booker


DOGO

, the thuggish, one-eyed bodyguard and henchman of Chief Nanga in A Man ofthe People.

M. Keith Booker

-73-

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