The Chinua Achebe Encyclopedia

By M. Keith Booker | Go to book overview

M

MACDERMOTT, SIR HUGH

, the pseudonym for the Governor of British West Africa in Arrow of God. In the 1920s, British West Africa consisted of the countries that are today Nigeria, Ghana, Sierra Leone, and Gambia. The governor to whom Achebe is probably referring is Graeme Thompson, whose lieutenant governor, H.C. Moorhouse, developed early grants for the road-building project that occurs at the beginning ofArrow of God. This makes the early timing of the novel 1922 or 1923.


FURTHER READING
A.E. Afigbo, The Warrant Chiefs.

Rachel R. Reynolds


MACDONALD

, alias for the real life J.F. Stewart, missionary killed at Ahiara (Abame in Achebe.) His name is first given as MacDonald in Arrow of God (chapter 10). Note that Achebe maintains the Scottishness of the character in accordance with the real historical figure.

Rachel R. Reynolds


MACHI

, the eldest brother of Obierika in Things Fall Apart. In chapter 8, he jokes about the leper Amadi, comparing him to the newly arrived white Europeans. Among the clan of Umuofia, the disease of leprosy is politely referred to as “the white skin.”

M. Keith Booker


MACMILLAN, JOHN

, a young Englishman whom Obi Okonkwo meets on the MVSasa on his journey from England back to Africa in chapter 3 of No Longer at Ease. Macmillan, an administrative officer in Northern Nigeria, and Obi become friends during the voyage, and the two of them and Clara Okeke enjoy walking together in Funchal in the Madeiras when their boat stops there on its way to Lagos.

Thomas J. Lynn


MACMILLAN, JOHN

, Assistant District Officer whom Tony Clarke replaces. MacMillan is mentioned as having died of cerebral malaria only four weeks after his arrival at Okperi. The mortality rate of British officers from disease throughout tropical locations in the empire was extraordinarily high, while others were brought in to work for a few years until they were severely debilitated and then shipped back home. A large number of these young officers were also young, lower-echelon officers from social classes far below the ranks of nobility; often they were

-136-

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The Chinua Achebe Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword: Chinua Achebe and the Institution of African Literature vii
  • Preface xvii
  • Chronology xix
  • A 1
  • B 39
  • C 51
  • D 73
  • E 76
  • F 83
  • G 91
  • H 96
  • I 109
  • J 122
  • K 126
  • L 130
  • M 136
  • N 161
  • O 191
  • P 218
  • R 229
  • S 233
  • T 246
  • U 270
  • V 280
  • W 281
  • Y 286
  • Z 288
  • Bibliography 289
  • Index 303
  • About the Contributors 315
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