The Chinua Achebe Encyclopedia

By M. Keith Booker | Go to book overview

N

NAIPAUL, SIR V(IDIADHAR) S(URAJPRASAD)

. Born in Trinidad in 1932 to Brahmin Hindu parents, V.S. Naipaul went to school in Trinidad, then later received his bachelor's degree in English literature from University College, Oxford. He began his writing career while working for the Caribbean service of the British Broadcasting Corporation and soon received recognition as a major literary voice in Britain and abroad. In addition to fiction, Naipaul has produced a substantial amount of nonfiction prose, primarily travel writing. He is a prolific writer; to date, he has authored more than two dozen books. He won the Nobel Prize in literature in 2001, in particular for his The Enigma of Arrival, a “novel” that intricately combines a number of genres, such as the autobiography, travelogue, and fiction. Enigma is also indicative of Naipaul's later work in the way it suggests a mellowing of Naipaul's notoriously harsh attitude toward developing Third World societies. This attitude has been distasteful to many, provoking Derek Walcott, another Caribbean author and a Nobel winner himself, to call him “V.S. Nightfall” in one of his poems.

Africa, however, receives the worst score in Naipaul's writing on postcolonial Third World societies; African writing and writers don't fare well either. He refers somewhat positively to Achebe in a 1971 interview where he discusses a variety of issues. He says, “there are good writers who are African. Chinua Achebe is a grand writer by most people's standards” (Jussawalla 27). Then he adds, “but he [Achebe] is not published in his own country. His work needs the blessing of a foreign market…the local society doesn't have any body of judgment as yet” (27). Next Naipaul goes on to attack the whole enterprise of “African writing, ” and what begins as something of a tribute becomes a veiled denigration of Achebe and his like—though Achebe is not mentioned again in the interview. African writers won't help themselves by writing “the sort of selfconscious 'African Writing' which is obsessed with tribal mores,” Naipaul declares (28). One wonders who he has in mind when he says, “[T]o encourage a young man merely to write nostalgically about tribal life is really slightly ridiculous” (29). The following statement reveals his undisguised loathing of Africa and its people: “I began my recent book about Africa with a great hatred of everyone, of the entire continent; and that had to be refined away, giving place to comprehension” (30). Naipaul probably refers to In a Free State; it was published the same

-161-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Chinua Achebe Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword: Chinua Achebe and the Institution of African Literature vii
  • Preface xvii
  • Chronology xix
  • A 1
  • B 39
  • C 51
  • D 73
  • E 76
  • F 83
  • G 91
  • H 96
  • I 109
  • J 122
  • K 126
  • L 130
  • M 136
  • N 161
  • O 191
  • P 218
  • R 229
  • S 233
  • T 246
  • U 270
  • V 280
  • W 281
  • Y 286
  • Z 288
  • Bibliography 289
  • Index 303
  • About the Contributors 315
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 324

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.