The Chinua Achebe Encyclopedia

By M. Keith Booker | Go to book overview

U

UCHENDU

, younger brother of the mother of Okonkwo in Things Fall Apart. He welcomes Okonkwo and his family to Mbanta in chapter 14 after they are exiled there when the misfiring of Okonkwo's gun causes the death of Ezeudu's sixteen-year-old son. Thirty years earlier, he had received the body of Okonkwo's mother when she was brought home to Mbanta for burial.

M. Keith Booker


UDENDO

, a woman from Umunneora, is Akuebue's neighbor in Arrow of God, chapter 16.

Rachel R. Reynolds


UDENKWO

. Along with Mgbogo, one of two women in chapter 12 of Things FallApart who fail to heed a call for help when a cow has accidentally been let loose on a neighbor's crops. Udenkwo does not appear because she is nursing her infant child.

M. Keith Booker


UDENKWO

, Akuebue's daughter in Arrowof God. A story about her stubbornness appears in chapter 14, in which we are treated to an extended discussion on Igbo family politics. Akuebue tells Ezeulu how his adult daughter takes umbrage when one of her chickens is mistakenly commandeered for sacrifice on the part of Akuebue's husband. We find that her anger, although unjustified over such a minor offense, could be best dealt with by a private apology from her (also proud) husband. Besides Achebe's taking the opportunity to tell a story about gender relations in colonial Igboland, the story about Udenkwo's pride could also be interpreted as a subtle warning from Akuebue to Ezeulu to be propitious in his treatment of both white men and the villagers.

Rachel R. Reynolds


UDEOZO

, or Anichebe Udeozo, is an elder of Umuaro (Arrow of God, chapters 12 and 18).

Rachel R. Reynolds


UDO

, a man of Umuofia and the husband of the woman murdered in the market at Mbaino in Things Fall Apart. He is given a young virgin from Mbaino to replace his dead wife.

M. Keith Booker


UDO

, a principal deity of the village of Okperi in Arrow of God.

Rachel R. Reynolds

-270-

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