Communism in History and Theory: Asia, Africa, and the Americas

By Donald F. Busky | Go to book overview

Preface

I would like to thank my late, beloved father, Robert Busky. He was that rare person who knew a great deal about politics, and who imparted to me his concern about social justice and his love of reading. By the late 1960s we were both opposing the Vietnam War and beginning to call ourselves socialists. I continued my efforts against the war and inequality at home as a member of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) in the early 1970s. In 1978 I joined the Socialist Party, USA, an independent democratic socialist party, and helped found its Greater Philadelphia local.

About the same time as we were founding our Socialist Party local, I received my B.A. degree in political science from Temple University, and went on to receive my M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from that university. I would like to dedicate this work to all the professors who have done so much to educate me and have repeatedly shown their kindness to me. A special thanks to my professors in the Department of Political Science of Temple University, where I did my undergraduate and graduate work, among them Drs. Peter Bachrach, Harry Bailey, Aryeh Botwinick, John Donnell, Robert Osborn, Sandra Featherman, Shirin Tahir-Kheli, and Conrad Weiler, Jr. They are wonderful professors who taught me what it meant to be a political scientist, the basics of Marxist and non-Marxist political theory, the comparative politics of Marxist-Leninist and noncommunist states, American politics, public policy, and so much more.

I would be remiss if I did not mention professors at other colleges and universities where I have taught who have been extremely kind. Those who particularly come to mind include Drs. Eric Brose and J. Walter High, Jr.

-ix-

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