The Cambridge Companion to Jonathan Swift

By Christopher Fox | Go to book overview

SUBJECT INDEX
Addison, Joseph: Cato, 42; friend to Swift, 32, 39–40; language academy proposal, 153; literature, power union, 44; stylistic differences from Swift, 42–43
Aeneid (Virgil), 82
ancients/moderns controversy: in The Battel of the Books, 80; Swift on, 41–43, 118, 203–6, 248; in A Tale of a Tub, 80
Anglo-Irish elite, 57–58
Anne, Queen of England, 23, 33, 35, 44
Antrim County, Kilroot parish, 18, 93–94, 162, 170, 207, 243
Arbuthnot, John, 32, 41
Atterbury, Francis, 156, 191
authority of the Church, 172, 208; established forms of, 213–14; free-thinkers vs., 214; in government, 37; Swift and, 61, 164, 168–69, 213–14, 252; subversion vs., in print materials, 208
autobiography, in works of Swift (see also entries under Gulliver's Travels; Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift): “The Author Upon Himself, ” 23, 185, 190; Family of Swift, 15, 16, 27, 68; “In Sickness, ” 190; Market Hill group, 52; Polite Conversation, 125–26; Pope, letter to (1722), 25, 26
Bailey, Nathan, 194
Ball, Elrington, 104
Barber, Mary, 106, 108
Behn, Aphra, 41
Bentley, Richard, 204–5, 248
Berkeley, Earl of (Charles), 19, 162, 252
Bettesworth, Richard (“Booby”), 63, 195
Bindon, David, 136, 137
Bolingbroke, Viscount (Henry St. John), 32, 36, 40, 43
Borges, Jorge Luis, 60
Boulter, Archbishop Hugh, 62
Boyle, John (Earl of Orrery), 15, 106, 108
The British Bulwark (Burnet), 151
Brown, Norman O., 28
Browne, John, 138
Burnet, Bishop Gilbert, 77–78, 165
Burnet, Thomas, 151
Burney, Frances, 108
Butler, Joseph, 246
Butler, Samuel, 76, 191
Butterfield, Herbert, 2
career, early years: overview, 49–50; Temple's executor, 18; Temple's secretary, 17, 18
career, literary: ambition in: disappointments, 70, of legacy, 59, 81, 202, religious principles vs., 18, 19, 20, 126; background, 17, 50; censorship advocated, 208; old age, 27, 234; sedition accusations, 24, 25; success in, 58–59
career, political: ambition in, 21–22, 23, 31, 40; disappointment in, 50, 198–99; First Fruits negotiation, 20–21, 33, 163, 165; friendships from, 32; literature, power union in, 44–45; Pope, letter to (1722), 25, 26; retirement from, 23; as Tory party supporter, 21–22, 23, 34–35, 38–39; as Whig party supporter, 33, 37; Whig vs. Tory allegiance, 2, 19–20, 35–36, 38–39, 40
career, political-writer: overview, 31; ambition in;, 40The Examiner editor, 21–22, 34–35, 40; Irish perspective, 32; personal loyalties in, 32–33; religious orientation in, 32–33
career, religious (see also entries under St. Patricks' Cathedral; religion, Swift's

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The Cambridge Companion to Jonathan Swift
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Cambridge Companion to Jonathan Swift *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Notes on Contributors vii
  • Chronology of Swift's Life x
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 11
  • 1 - Swift's Life 14
  • 2 - Politics and History 31
  • Notes 46
  • 3 - Swift the Irishman 48
  • Notes 71
  • 4 - Swift's Reading 73
  • Notes 85
  • 5 - Swift and Women 87
  • Notes 109
  • 6 - Swift's Satire and Parody 112
  • 7 - Swift on Money and Economics 128
  • Notes 142
  • 8 - Language and Style 146
  • Notes 158
  • 9 - Swift and Religion 161
  • Notes 175
  • 10 - Swift the Poet 177
  • Notes 200
  • 11 - A Tale of a Tub and Early Prose 202
  • Notes 215
  • 12 - Gulliver's Travels and the Later Writings 216
  • Notes 237
  • 13 - Classic Swift 241
  • Notes 253
  • Bibliography 256
  • Subject Index 266
  • Title Index 280
  • Cambridge Companions to Literature 284
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