The Politics of Child Support in America

By Jocelyn Elise Crowley | Go to book overview

5
Conservatives as Challenger Entrepreneurs

No one considered Gerald R. Ford and his Republican colleagues to be likely policy trailblazers. When Richard M. Nixon resigned the presidency effective August 9, 1974, the immediate future of social policy in the United States seemed to be largely predictable–and largely unremarkable, for that matter. Ford, who had served in Congress from Michigan for over twenty-five years and then for one year in the vice-presidency, promised the country stability. And for the most part, stability–some would say immobility–is what he provided.

Some of this paralysis Ford brought upon himself. His September 1974 pardon of Richard Nixon did not help to energize a nation searching for the redress of past injustices. And then there was the devastating impact of the economy. By 1974, inflation was soaring to a rate of 12 percent per year, and unemployment was well over 7 percent. Traditional methods of stimulating the economy, such as tax cuts and increased spending, did not seem to have the impact they had once had in past cycles of boom and bust. Moreover, the deepening energy crisis did nothing to endear Ford to the American public. Citizens all over the country were waiting in long lines for overpriced gas that was in short supply due to the Arab oil embargo of 1973. Adding to the stalemate, Ford himself was continually at odds with the country's overwhelmingly Democratic Congress, and vetoed a record number of bills during his brief tenure in office.

It was surprising, therefore, that Ford would prove to be such a visionary when it came to child support enforcement. In a 1975 speech urging the rapid implementation of child support legislation, Senator Sam

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Politics of Child Support in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 217

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.