On-Site Inspection in Theory and Practice: A Primer on Modern Arms Control Regimes

By George L.Rueckert | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Because of their continuous presence over an extended period of the territory of the inspected Party, portal monitors may be rejected for any reason without explanation.
2.
Under the INF Treaty which was implemented during the Cold War, the United States rejected seven people on the original list of portal monitors submitted by the Soviet Union, all of whom had been previously identified by various countries as having engaged in unacceptable (espionage-related) behavior. The United States also rejected one person on the initial INF inspector's list who, as a Soviet diplomat, had previously been expelled from the U.S. Although reciprocity on treaty implementation issues was then the rule, the Soviets did not reject any U.S. inspectors on the initial INF lists, possibly due to fortuitous timing; U.S. rejection of the Soviets personnel came after the Soviets already had approved all U.S. inspectors. Later the Soviets did reject a United States inspector, without providing a reason, probably as a retaliatory measure.
3.
Reflecting the general easing of visa requirements in Europe for residents of neighboring or allied countries, many CFE inspectors do not require visas, and in those cases where visas are required, they can be obtained upon entry into the inspected country. This is a good example of finding a practical solution to an otherwise potentially confusing and distracting inspection issue.
4.
These are designated points of entry/exit in the CFE Treaty given the large number of facilities that are inspectable in certain countries and the possibility that, with sequential inspections, inspection teams may enter the country at one point and exit it at another.
5.
For example, under START, portal monitors can use satellite communications only if facsimile communications through their embassy cannot be achieved within twenty minutes.

-75-

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