International Terrorism in the Contemporary World

By Marius H. Livingston; Lee Bruce Kress et al. | Go to book overview

JACOB SUNDBERG

The Antiterrorist Legislation in Sweden

The Buildup of Leftist Privileges

During the 1960s a policy of involvement gradually succeeded the neutral and more prudent Swedish policy of the 1950s. The Greek coup d'etat of August 21, 1967, particularly incensed leading socialist circles and created a strong reaction. Efforts were made to cultivate the birth of a Greek resistance movement, partially directed by the dethroned Greek politican Professor Andreas Papandreou. He was invited to direct his fight against the Greek regime from Sweden. He cooperated with Anthony Brillakis, head of the Greek Communist party, to establish terrorist activities in Greece.

The new policy of involvement led the Swedish government to abandon its previous demands that refugees who had been given asylum in Sweden refrain from political activity there. 1 Instead, it was decided that foreigners could enjoy the same freedom as Swedes to engage in political activity. 2 Since they were not allowed to participate in the Swedish elections, the formula mainly operated to allow the Papandreou type of political activity. This change in attitude (hereinafter called the Papandreou policy) for the first time had the effect of attracting refugees from outside of the socialist camp. Sweden now turned into a haven for an ever-increasing number of people whose socialist views led to their persecution and repression by some dictatorship or other.

Under the new socialist leadership of the mid-1960s, Sweden entered into an era of virulently anti-American policy which dominated the subsequent period and at times reached such heights that the American ambassador was withdrawn. Part of this policy was due to the intense support for the socialist regime that took over in Chile in 1970 under President Allende. In the increasingly polarized Chilean society that developed after the take-over, the Swedish government sympathized more with those seeking to destroy the managerial and middle classes and to establish a dictatorship of the revolutionary left, than with the opponents of the regime. The Cuban regime took a similar attitude and concentrated on Chile after 1970, moving its headquarters for revolutionary activity from the Paris embassy to the new Cuban embassy in Santiago. 3 The Pinochet coup of September 11, 1973, was felt in Sweden to be an enormous setback.

Pressured by the leftist forces on which the position of the new Swedish leadership depended, the government allowed large numbers of Chilean

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Terrorism in the Contemporary World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 527

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.