International Terrorism in the Contemporary World

By Marius H. Livingston; Lee Bruce Kress et al. | Go to book overview

MARVIN MAURER

The Ku Klux Klan and the National Liberation Front: Terrorism Applied to Achieve Diverse Goals

Introduction

The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) of the 1860s and the National Liberation Front (NLF) of the 1960s are considered polar opposites in terms of their goals and tactics. The latter is described as part of a nationalist movement whose aim was to rid South Vietnam (SVN) of foreign domination and a native “fascist” regime ensconced in Saigon. By contrast the KKK is portrayed as an immoral collection of racist thugs who irresponsibly terrorized blacks and moderates alike.

However, in an era long before “terrorism” became a field of study the Klan enjoyed widespread support by “well-meaning” citizens in this country. Klansmen were regarded as heroes as typified in the 1915 extravaganza film, The Birth of a Nation. In this film vanquished Southern whites were terrorized by white and black politicians and their easily controlled sex-crazed black troops dressed in Union blue. These ruthless predators threatened old and cherished family values. The aged, the meek, and above all white women were murdered, abused, and humiliated. In desperate response, bands of hooded men rallied to the call of justice. Under the white hoods and robes were “clean-cut” veterans of the defeated Confederacy.

Similarly the NLF passed around stories about village folk heroes avenging horrible outrages against the people. For instance, a 1963 clandestine newspaper told of Bau Bau, an ordinary young peasant whose bride was kidnapped by the enemy. She resisted. Infuriated, the troops stripped her, raped her, and took out her liver and devoured it. The husband then joined a guerrilla band and learned the art of war. He soon avenged the outrage. 1

Of course, the propaganda scenes in The Birth of a Nation were reverse images of what actually happened. It was the newly liberated blacks and white moderates who were victimized and terrorized by the KKK. Since World War II, the Klan has been stripped of its myths; and the American government and the defunct Government of Vietnam (GVN) are more likely to be linked to atrocities and bombings, while the tactics of the NLF are rarely reviewed, let alone popularized. 2 The NLF waged a terror and propaganda campaign designed to destroy the leadership and morale of SVN. So

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Terrorism in the Contemporary World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 527

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.