Hasidism: Between Ecstasy and Magic

By Moshe Idel | Go to book overview

Notes

NOTES TO INTRODUCTION
1.
On the reception of Buber's rendering of Hasidic tales in Europe see the introduction of Paul Mendes-Flohr and Ze'ev Gries to the reprinting of Buber's The Tales of Rabbi Nahman, trans. M. Friedman ( Atlantic Highlands, N.J., 1988), pp. ix— xxviii.
2.
Martin Buber, " Interpreting Hasidism," Commentary 36, 3 ( September, 1963): 218-25; Gershom Scholem, " Martin Buber's Interpretation of Hasidism" in his The Messianic Idea pp. 228-50. This is the expanded version of the article originally printed in Commentary 32 ( 1961): 305-16. On this controversy, see Rivka Schatz‐ Uffenheimer, " Man's Relationship to God and World in Buber's Rendering of Hasidic Teachings," in The Philosophy of Martin Buber, ed. Paul Schilpp and Maurice Friedman ( La Salle, Ill., 1967), pp. 403-35 and her introduction to Quietistic Elements ( Jerusalem, 1974) pp. 10- 18 (Hebrew); as well as the studies of Michael Oppenheim, " The Meaning of Hasidut: Martin Buber and Gershom Scholem," in Journal of the American Academy of Religion 49, 3 ( 1981): 409-21; Steven D. Kepnes " A Hermeneutic Approach to the Buber-Scholem Controversy," Journal of Jewish Studies 38 ( 1987): 81- 98, the introduction by Samuel H. Dresner to Abraham J. Heschel, The Circle of the Ba ʿal Shem Tov: Studies in Hasidism, ed. S. H. Dresner ( Chicago. London, 1985), pp. xvi— xix and David Biale (note 33 below).

Buber's view of Hasidism, including the description of the criticism of Scholem, has been discussed extensively in Grete Schaeder, The Hebrew Humanism of Martin Buber, trans. N.J. Jacobs (Wayne State University Press: Detroit, 1973), pp. 287- 338; Rahel Shihor, "Buber's Method in his Research of Hasidism" Da ʾat 2/ 3 ( 1978-79): 241-46 (Hebrew). On Scholem and Hasidism, see Louis Jacobs " Aspects of Scholem's Study of Hasidism," Modern Judaism 5 ( 1985), reprinted in Harold Bloom, ed., Gershom Scholem ( New York, New Haven. Philadelphia. 1987), pp. 179-88, and Rivka Schatz-Uffenheimer, "Gershom Scholem's Interpretation of Hasidism" in Gershom Scholem, The Man and His Activity ( Jerusalem, 1983), pp. 48- 62 (Hebrew); Jon D. Levenson " The Hermeneutical Defense of Buber's Hasidism: A Critique and Counterstatement," Modern Judaism 11 ( 1991): 297- 320. See also Tishby's stand in relation to Buber and Scholem's views of the neutralization of messianism in Hasidism, in Messianic Idea, pp. 1- 45.

3.
See e.g.. Zeʾev Gries, " Hasidism: The Present State of Research and Some Desirable Priorities." Numen 34 ( 1987): 97- 108, 180- 213; Mendel Piekarz, The Beginning of Hasidism: Ideological Trends in Derush and Musar Literature ( Jerusalem, 1978), pp. 299- 302 (Hebrew).
4.
A main exception is Schatz-Uffenheimer's Quietistic Elements. See also Scholem's essays on the addiq and devequt.

-251-

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Hasidism: Between Ecstasy and Magic
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Hasidism - Between Ecstasy and Magic *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I Models in Kabbalah and Hasidism *
  • 1 - The Weakening of the Lurianic Kabbalah in the Eighteenth Century *
  • 2 - Models in Jewish Mysticism 45
  • 3 - The Mystico-Magical Model 103
  • Part II - Drawing Down *
  • 4 - Mystical and Magical Prayer in Hasidism 148
  • 5 - Mystical and Magical Study in Hasidism 171
  • 6 - Zaddiq as "Vessel" and "Channel" in Hasidism 189
  • Concluding Remarks *
  • Appendix A - Psychologization of Theosophy in Kabbalah and Hasidism 227
  • Appendix B - Rabbi Yisrael of Ryzhin Who Cries 239
  • Appendix C - On Intentional Transmission of Power 245
  • Abbreviations 249
  • Notes 251
  • Bibliography 393
  • Appendix of Hebrew Quotes 403
  • Subject Index 425
  • Index of Works Cited 429
  • Author Index 435
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